Winter Buzz – Part 3

 

Don’t you just love the honeycomb pattern over the top of the hand?  I am always amazed at the gorgeous designs that are created using simple cables.  Tell all your non-knitting friends that this was insanely difficult and that you are pretty much a genius.  It will be our secret that cabling is so easy!

Today’s clue has us decreasing for the top of the mitten.  Nothing can strike fear in the hearts of knitters more than the phrase, “decrease in pattern”.  The knitter is left to wonder how to decrease, where to decrease and how exactly to maintain the established pattern.  Have no fear!  I have taken all the guess work out for you by providing directions for each stitch in the decrease process.

As you work through each round, I hope you will come to understand the strategies used to maintain the cable design while decreasing stitches.  In Winter Buzz, the stitches are decreased every other round.  When the cable row presents itself, sometimes there are not enough stitches to form the outer four-stitch cables.  It is in these instances that a bit of cable knowledge is helpful.

When decreasing in pattern, it is sometimes necessary to form a cable with fewer stitches than the “normal” amount worked throughout the cable pattern.  When faced with this dilemma, remember this tip:

  • The stitches in the cable that deviate from the “normal” stitch count of the cable should be hidden in the back of the work behind the cross of the cable.  The stitches in the front of the cable should have the same stitch count as the rest of the cables in the pattern.

Here are some examples:

  • It is time to work a four-stitch cable with stitches held to the back (C4B).  However, there are only three stitches remaining.  Hold one stitch to the back and knit two stitches from the left hand needle.  Knit the held stitch.  A three-stitch cable was formed.  Because the deviation from the usual stitch count (one stitch held in back instead of two) is hidden behind the cross of the cable, it is nearly undetectable.
  • It is time to work a four-stitch cable with stitches held to the front (C4F).  However, there are only three stitches remaining.  Hold two stitches to the front and knit one stitch from the left hand needle.  Knit the held stitches.  A three-stitch cable was formed.  Because the deviation from the usual stitch count (one stitch knit from left hand needle instead of two) is hidden behind the cross of the cable, it is nearly undetectable.

Store this cable know-how away for future patterns to create a professional look to your garment shaping.  Meanwhile, in Winter Buzz, simply follow the pattern directions below to master this discriminating treatment.  There are separate instructions for mittens that ended after Round 4 and for those ended after Round 8.  Be sure to follow the appropriate decrease rounds for your mitten.

Once your mitten top is shaped, close the opening with the Kitchener Stitch.  This seamless grafting stitch is a useful skill every knitter should possess.  Watch my Kitchener Stitch” Video to learn this great finishing technique.

For the fingerless mitts, no decreasing is needed in the cable pattern.  Look for the simple cuff directions at the end of this clue and get ready for next week’s thumb.

Part Three

Click here to download printable version

k2tog – knit two together.  See “k2tog” Video

ssk – slip next stitch as if to knit, slip next stitch as if to knit, insert left needle into the front of these two slipped stitches from left to right and knit together.  See “ssk” Video

Top of Mitten

Decrease in pattern using appropriate instructions for Hand ended after Round 4 (below) or Round 8 (following).

If Hand ended after Round 4:

1.  Top of Hand:  k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.  Palm:  k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.  (44 stitches)

2.  Top of Hand:  sl 2 to cn and hold in front, k1, k2 from cn, (C4B, C4F) twice, sl 1 to cn and hold in back, k2, k1 from cn.  Palm:  knit.

3.  Same as 1.  (40 stitches)

4.  Knit all stitches.

5.  Same as 1.  (36 stitches)

6.  Top of Hand:  k1, (C4F, C4B) twice, k1.  Palm:  knit.

7.  Same as 1.  (32 stitches)

8.  Knit all stitches.

9.  Same as 1.  (28 stitches)

10.  Top of Hand:  sl 1 to cn and hold in back, k2, k1 from cn, C4F, C4B, sl 2 to cn and hold in front, k1, k2 from cn.  Palm:  knit.

11.  Same as 1.   (24 stitches)

Close top of mitten using Kitchener Stitch.  See “Kitchener Stitch” Video

 

If Hand ended after Round 8:

1.  Top of Hand:  k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.  Palm:  k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.  (44 stitches)

2.  Top of Hand:  sl 1 to cn and hold in back, k2, k1 from cn, (C4F, C4B) twice, sl 2 to cn and hold in front, k1, k2 from cn.  Palm:  knit.

3.  Same as 1.  (40 stitches)

4.  Knit all stitches.

5.  Same as 1.  (36 stitches)

6.  Top of Hand:  k1, (C4B, C4F) twice, k1.  Palm:  knit.

7.  Same as 1.  (32 stitches)

8.  Knit all stitches.

9.  Same as 1.  (28 stitches)

10.  Top of Hand:  sl 2 to cn and hold in front, k1, k2 from cn, C4B, C4F, sl 1 to cn and hold in back, k2, k1 from cn.  Palm:  knit.

11.  Same as 1.  (24 stitches)

Close top of mitten using Kitchener Stitch.  See “Kitchener Stitch” Video

 

 Fingerless Mitt Top Cuff

Using smaller size needles, decrease 6 stitches in the next round as follows:

*(k2, p1, k2tog, k1, p1) 3 times, k2 p1: repeat from  * to end of round.  (42 stitches)

Work a k2, p1 rib for 3 rounds.

Bind off in pattern.  See “Bind Off in Pattern” Video

 

STOP!

We will knit our thumbs in next week’s clue.  Happy knitting!

10 thoughts on “Winter Buzz – Part 3

  1. Hi Michelle,
    I was trying to finish my mitten from winter buzz pattern and went on your site here and couldn’t find the instructions for thumbs. I started this project a couple of years ago and must have put in down and I discovered it last night. I have made the matching hat and absolutely love it.
    Is there a part 4 for the mittens that are published anywhere?
    Thanks

  2. I am making the fingerless mitten….What is a good length between end of gusset and end of the fingerless glove. Only 3 rows seems so short. I use my gloves when out for a photo shoot and need alot of fingers to grip the camera, etc.

  3. Just bound off my fingerless mitt hands. I really like the 2×1 ribbing. It melds seamlesly with the cables. And it was great to work on M1’s, and to know there’s a good video resource thenext time I ought to Kitchener. Weaving ends so that whenthe thumb is done, I’m all done.

  4. When knitting in the round, the needles need to be on the side of the circle closest to you. When you are knitting with the needles on the far side of the circle it causes your knitting to be inside out. There won’t be any harm with it knit inside out. After knitting, turn it right side out before closing it with the Kitchener stitch.

  5. My mitten is coming along Nicely, however I’m knitting it wrong side out. How did this happen and will I be able to finish? How can I fix this?

  6. I’m with you Stacie! When I was getting bundled up to go out today I was wishing my mittens were done. Hey Knit Purl, I finally got a project going and am keeping up! LOL

  7. Sure wish I had thumbs for my mittens since it was -1 this morning driving from Bucyrus to Dublin! My poor hands were sooooo cold and were screaming for Winter Buzz to keep them toasty =)

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