8 thoughts on “German Short Row Heel

  1. Thanks for knitting along with me! I wish I were sitting next to you to help solve your problem. The stitches will look slightly different on each side. My best advice is to not pull the stitches too snugly when creating the double stitch. Also, be sure to reseat the double stitch correctly on the purl side when working it. Good luck and happy knitting!

  2. I’m having a problem when going back to circular knitting and knitting the double stitches that were created on the purl side. My stitches look wrong, there’s a horizontal bar in them. I’ve ripped out and redone this so many times but I can’t figure out what I’m doing wrong! Appreciate your help, and I love your videos and books!

  3. How do you determine how many stitches are in the middle. I usually have 28 stitches on the heel needle so not devisable by 3.
    Thank you

  4. Thank you so much for a great tutorial! I’ve not turned a heel in awhile and wanted to try a different method. Your video was perfect.

  5. I would work the foot until 2″ shorter than length of foot. For any short row heel, typically 1/3 of the sts remain unworked. I would probably leave 12 sts unworked. Happy knitting!

  6. How soon should I start this German Short Row Heal on a Toe Up Sock? For instance, for the Mitered Heel or the Afterthought Heel, it says to work the instep to 2 inches before the back of the heel; for the Gusset Heel to work the instep for 3 inches. I was just wondering how much instep to knit before you start the German Short Row Heal. And my pattern doesn’t specify which heel; each side of my sock has 32 stitches, so how many stitches should I leave for the center?
    Thank you so much for your advice! And I love your videos!

  7. Thank you so much for showing this technique… wished I had learned this long ago at Mystery sock, this is my new go to heel!!! I’ve used it on 3 pair of socks now!

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