Audition – Part 2

Our shawl is off to a great start and now it’s time to add a few more sections and patterns.  Before we begin, some knitters have expressed concern that their MC is weighing less than the stated weights I have given.  The final section of the shawl will be one that can be easily adjusted to fewer rows if you have a smaller amount of yarn.  Don’t worry and knit on with confidence!

Section #4 – Stripes

Following last week’s Little Gulls is a bit of striping to separate the stitch patterns.  The striping frames the pattern below and sets the stage for a lovely design in Section #5.  Continue to carry the yarns up the side of the fabric while striping for a clean edge.  For your convenience, I continue to provide stitch counts.  At the conclusion on Section #4, cut the Contrasting Color yarn as it will not be used in Section #5.

Section #5 – Garter and Lace

This section features a happy little lace pattern that combines both garter and stockinette.  It is a joy to knit and I can imagine it making its way into all sorts of knitting projects.

I have long been vexed by the inability of a left leaning decrease to exactly mimic the tidy appearance of the right leaning k2tog.  An ssk is very close to mirroring a k2tog, but just not tidy enough, especially when the decreases appear side by side.  I have found that if the ssk is worked slightly differently, it results in a left lean that is pretty darn close to the k2tog.  To work the Improved SSK, slip the first stitch of the pair as if to knit (as in a standard ssk) and then slip the second stitch as if to purl.  Insert the left hand needle into the front of these two stitches and then knit them together.  A simple alteration with big results!  This version of the ssk can be used any time a pattern asks for an ssk.  I recommend using this version of the ssk in the Garter and Lace pattern for beautiful lace diamonds.  Watch my newest video and see if you agree.  See ssk Improved video.

This fairly simple design only looks complicated due to the number of rows in this section.  The written row instructions spell out the edge stitches, the ten-stitch repeat and the stitch counts for all 54 rows.

For chart lovers, I have broken the rows into two charts for easier reading.  The charts have the same edge anomalies as found in last week’s post, but by now you are no doubt used to its irregularities.  As always, if the chart poses a question, simply refer to the written row directions for confirmation.  Work each chart once.

At the end of Section #5, don’t cut the Main Color yarn as it will be used in next week’s Section #6.

Until next week, happy knitting!

Michelle

Part Two

Click here to download printable version

Abbreviations

CC – contrasting color.

k2tog – knit two together.  See K2tog Video

kfb – knit into front and back of stitch.  See Kfb Video

MC – main color.

ssk (Improved) – slip next stitch as if to knit, slip next stitch as if to purl, insert left needle into the front of these two slipped stitches from left to right and knit together.  See SSK Improved Video 

yo – yarn over.  See Yarn Over Video

 

Instructions

Section #4 (MC and CC)

Row 1. (RS) With MC, k1, kfb, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 2. (WS) With MC, knit to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.  81 sts

Row 3. With CC, same as 1.

Row 4. With CC, same as 2.  82 sts

Row 5.  With MC, same as 1.

Row 6.  With MC, same as 2.  83 sts

Row 7.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 8.  With CC, same as 2.  84 sts

Row 9.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 10.  With CC, same as 2.  85 sts

Row 11.  With MC, same as 1.

Row 12.  With MC, same as 2.  86 sts

Row 13.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 14.  With CC, same as 2.  87 sts

Cut CC yarn.  MC = 157g.   First skein of CC = 18g

 

Section #5 (All MC)

Garter and Lace Diamonds (See Charts below)

Row 1. (RS) K1, kfb, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 2. (WS) K5, p2, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 6 sts, k4, kfb, k1.  88 sts

Row 3.  Same as 1.

Row 4.  *K4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 8 sts, k4, p2, kfb, k1.  89 sts

Row 5.  Same as 1.

Row 6.  K3, p2, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 10 sts, k4, p2, k2, kfb, k1.  90 sts

Row 7.  K1, kfb, k1, k2tog, yo, k2, yo, ssk, k2, *k2, k2tog, yo, k2, yo, ssk, k2; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k2, k2tog, yo, k2, k2tog, k1.

Row 8.  K2, purl to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.  91 sts

Row 9.  K1, kfb, k1, *k1, k2tog, yo, k4, yo, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last 8 sts, k1, k2tog, yo, k2, k2tog, k1.

Row 10.  Same as 8.  92 sts

Row 11.  K1, kfb, k1, yo, ssk, *k2tog, yo, k6, yo, ssk; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k2tog, yo, k2, k2tog, k1.

Row 12.  Same as 8.  93 sts

Row 13.  Same as 1.

Row 14.  K4, p1, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 8 sts, p1, k5, kfb, k1.  94 sts

Row 15.  Same as 1.

Row 16.  K3, p1, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 10 sts, p1, k7, kfb, k1.  95 sts

Row 17.  Same as 1.

Row 18.  K2, p1, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.  96 sts

Row 19.  K1, kfb, k1, *k1, yo, ssk, k4, k2tog, yo, k1; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 20.  Same as 8.  97 sts

Row 21.  K1, kfb, k3, *k2, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k2; repeat from * to last 12 sts, k2, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, k1.

Row 22.  Same as 8.  98 sts

Row 23.  K1, kfb, k2tog, yo, k3, *k3, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k3; repeat from * to last 11 sts, k3, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, k1.

Row 24.  Same as 8.  99 sts

Row 25.  Same as 1.

Row 26.  K3, p2, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 10 sts, k4, p2, k2, kfb, k1.  100 sts

Row 27.  Same as 1.

Row 28.  K2, p2, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.   101 sts

Row 29.  Same as 1.

Row 30.  K2, p1, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, kfb, k1.  102 sts

Row 31.  K1, kfb, k3, *k2, k2tog, yo, k2, yo, ssk, k2; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k4, k2tog, k1.

Row 32.  Same as 8.  103 sts

Row 33.  K1, kfb, k2, yo, ssk, k1, *k1, k2tog, yo, k4, yo, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last 6 sts, k3, k2tog, k1.

Row 34.  Same as 8.  104 sts

Row 35.  K1, kfb, k5, yo, ssk, *k2tog, yo, k6, yo, ssk; repeat from * to last 5 sts, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k1.

Row 36.  Same as 8.  105 sts

Row 37.  Same as 1.

Row 38.  K2, p1, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.  106 sts

Row 39.  Same as 1.

Row 40.  K2, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 4 sts, p1, k1, kfb, k1.  107 sts

Row 41.  Same as 1.

Row 42.  K10, p1, *p1, k8, p1; repeat from * to last 6 sts, p1, k3, kfb, k1.  108 sts

Row 43.  K1, kfb, k2, k2tog, yo, k1, *k1, yo, ssk, k4, k2tog, yo, k1; repeat from * to last 11 sts, k1, yo, ssk, k5, k2tog, k1.

Row 44.  Same as 8.  109 sts

Row 45.  K1, kfb, k3, k2tog, yo, k2, *k2, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k2; repeat from * to last 10 sts k2, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, k1.

Row 46.  Same as 8.  110 sts

Row 47.  K1, kfb, k2, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k3, *k3, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k3; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k3, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, k1.

Row 48.  Same as 8.  111 sts

Row 49.  Same as 1.

Row 50.  K2, p1, k4, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, kfb, k1.  112 sts

Row 51.  Same as 1.

Row 52.  K6, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 6 sts, k4, kfb, k1.  113 sts

Row 53.  Same as 1.

Row 54.  K5, *k4, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 8 sts, k4, p2, kfb, k1.  114 sts

MC = 103g

Do NOT cut MC yarn as it will be used in next week’s Section #6.

 

Section #5 – Garter and Lace Diamonds, Rows 1 – 24 (MC)                                                                      

10-stitch repeat between red lines, work Rows 1-24 once

(Click on chart to enlarge)

Section #5 (cont.) – Garter and Lace Diamonds, Rows 25 – 54 (MC)                                                              

10-stitch repeat between red lines, work Rows 25-54 once

(Click on chart to enlarge)

Audition – Part 1

Welcome to the Progressive Needles Knit Along sponsored by Skacel Collection.  A big thank you to Skacel for their dedication to knitting education that makes this series possible!

Before we begin, here is an overview of the KAL:

  • A portion of the 4-part mystery pattern is revealed here on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Thursdays in October at 9am Eastern time.  The weekly pattern, video resources and lots of helpful tips are included in each post.  An abbreviated, pattern-only version is included to download.
  • All techniques are supported with video instruction at knitpurlhunter.com
  • All questions and comments are monitored daily both here and in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.  It’s like having  your own private knitting tutor!
  • Projects completed by November 15th are eligible for the monthly prize drawing – first prize is a set of addi Clicks!  See skacelknitting.com for all the info.
  • VERY IMPORTANT:  Audition is a FREE pattern through November 15th.  After this date, it will only be available for purchase on Ravelry.  Be sure to download each portion of the pattern prior to this date.  Saving it to your Ravelry page will NOT save the pattern.  The helpful tips and videos for each section will remain on my website indefinitely.

Audition is an asymmetrical shawl full of interesting stitches and patterns that result in a piece you will love to knit and wear.  The pattern is aptly named Audition because there are lots of new stitches to “try out”. 

Let’s begin with a few words about yarn management.  I will be providing the yarn weights throughout the pattern to help assess proper yardage.  Please note that yarn weights vary, by as much as 5 grams, at the start of each skein due to humidity levels and other environmental factors.  However, the yardage is carefully regulated so have no fear if the skein weighs less than the stated grams.  You can rest assured that you do have the stated yardage.  I knit my skein of Spray beginning at the outside of the skein, but starting at either end will work.  The Spray yarn will change from light to dark hues several times and starting in either direction will complement the design.

Section 1

The shawl will grow into its shape by a series of increases and decreases.  Every right side row begins with k1, kfb and ends with k2tog, k1.  These offsetting stitches coax the shawl into shape.  Every wrong side row ends with kfb, k1 which increases the stitch count by one at that edge of the shawl.  This same edge detail will continue throughout the entire shawl.

Begin by casting on five stitches in your preferred method with the Main Color yarn.  I used the Long Tail Cast On, but any style will work.  I recommend hanging a marker on the right side of the work to avoid any confusion with right and wrong sides.  Repeat Rows 1 and 2 until there are 56 stitches on the needle ending after completing a wrong side row.

Section 2

In this section a bit of striping is added for interest.  Garter stripes of contrasting colors are a great way to showcase any beautiful colors.  When alternating rows of color in striping and color knitting, it is not necessary to cut the yarn at each color change.  The multiple colors may remain attached to the piece, reducing the number of tails in the project.  When it is time to change colors at the beginning of a row (after the initial join), drop the old color and bring up the new color from behind and underneath to begin knitting.  This creates a tidy edge with less bulk.

The general rule in knitting is if a yarn will not be used for four or more rows, it is a good idea to carry the resting yarn up the side of the fabric.  This helps maintain an even tension and also prevents large loops that can snag with use.  In this section, the yarn only rests for four rows so it is optional if you would like to carry the yarn up the side.  I do prefer to carry it for a clean look.  To carry the unused yarn up the side, bring it to the front and over the working yarn at the beginning of a row.  The resting yarn is “caught” in the working yarn and carried up the side.  Take care that the carried yarn is not pulled too tightly, so as to help maintain a consistent tension.  Watch my Carrying Yarn Up The Side video for a complete tutorial.

At the end of Section 2, cut the Main Color yarn.  The upcoming section is worked all in Contrasting Color and is too long of a stretch to carry the yarn up the side.

Section 3

A fun stitch, know as Little Gulls (above), is worked in the contrasting color.  This textured beauty is actually quite easy to work.  The tiny, winged stitches are formed by picking up long strands of slipped stitches and catching them in the stitch above resulting in a butterfly-like design.  The long strands (or floats) are constructed by slipping five stitches with yarn in front.  It is important to remember that a stitch is always slipped as if to purl with yarn held to the wrong side unless otherwise stated.  In this pattern you are directed to slip 5 with yarn in front (wyif).  This means the stitches are still slipped as if to purl, but the yarn is held in an otherwise stated (wyif) position.

The Little Gull stitch is very similar to the Butterfly Stitch used in my Building In Color book (left) and Fluttered Socks (right) which use three strands instead of the one strand in Audition.  To avoid any confusion, I have filmed a Little Gulls video to guide you through the process.

Before working the Little Gulls stitch, two set up rows are required and they are NOT in the Little Gulls chart.

The pattern includes both written and charted instructions for this section.  Charting a shawl with this type of shaping presents some unique problems.  When comparing the chart to the shawl’s written instructions, you will notice a discrepancy with the edge stitches.  The repeat is found between the bold red lines.  In some rows, the edge stitches also include one of the eight-stitch repeats.  This chart modification was needed to maintain the visual integrity of the chart repeat.

Another chart anomaly is found in the left edge stitches on right side rows. The right side rows will always end with k2tog, k1.  Its offsetting increase is found at the beginning of the row.  If you are following the chart it will show one less “square” on the left edge than the number of stitches you have on your needle.  For example, in Row 1 the left edge stitches on the chart read: slip 5 wyif, k4, k2tog, k1 and uses eleven squares on the chart.  However, the k2tog requires two stitches to execute that decrease so in reality there will be twelve stitches on the needle for these edge stitches.  Chart followers will need to train their brain to remember that each k2tog on this edge of shawl counts as two stitches on the needle.  This sounds much more complicated than it is! Any confusion can be easily verified by comparing the charted instructions with the written instructions.

I have provided the stitch count at the end of every wrong side row.  It’s always a good idea to count and stay on track.

At the end of Section 3, your shawl is shaping up nicely and ready for another new stitch pattern next week.

Until next week, happy knitting!

Michelle

Part One

Click her to download printable version

Materials

  • MC (Option 1): Simplicity Spray; 55% Merino Superwash, 28% Acrylic, 17% Nylon; 456 yards per 200 gram cake , 1 cake—OR— MC (Option 2): Simplicity Tonal, 55% Merino Superwash, 28% Acrylic, 17% Nylon; 117 yards per 50 gram hank, 4 hanks of the same color.
  • Contrasting Color (CC) – Simplicity by HiKoo, 55% merino superwash, 28% acrylic, 17% nylon, 50 g/117 yds, 2 skeins
  • US #7 (4.5mm) addi 24-32” circular needle

Gauge

Approximately 20 stitches and 41 rows = 4” in garter stitch, unblocked

Size

Asymmetrical triangle, approximately 16” deep and 67” at longest edge

Abbreviations

B (Butterfly) – insert right hand needle under the slipped strand from bottom upward, knit next stitch pulling the loop under the strand and catching it as the knit stitch is completed.

See Little Gulls Video 

CC – contrasting color.

k2tog – knit two together.  See K2tog Video

kfb – knit into front and back of stitch.  See Kfb Video

MC – main color.

 sl – slip.  See Slip Stitch Video

wyif  – with yarn in front. 

Instructions

 Section #1 (All MC)

Using MC, cast on 5 sts.

Row 1. (RS) K1, kfb, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 2. (WS) Knit to last 2 sts, kfb, k1. (1 st increased)

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 until there are 56 stitches ending after Row 2.

Approx. 165g remaining in MC.

 

 Section #2 (MC and CC)

Row 1. (RS) With CC, k1, kfb, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 2. (WS) With CC, knit to last 2 sts, kfb, k1.  (1 st increased)

Row 3. With MC, same as 1.

Row 4. With MC, same as 2.

Row 5.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 6.  With CC, same as 2.

Row 7.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 8.  With CC, same as 2.

Row 9.  With MC, same as 1.

Row 10.  With MC, same as 2.

Row 11.  With CC, same as 1.

Row 12.  With CC, same as 2.

Row 13.  With MC, same as 1.

Row 14.  With MC, same as 2.  (63 stitches)

Cut MC yarn.

Section #3 – Little Gulls (CC)

Set Up

Set Up Row 1. (RS) K1, kfb, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Set Up Row 2. (WS) K2, p2, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, kfb, k1.  64 sts

Little Gulls (See Chart below)

Row 1. (RS) K1, kfb, k2, *sl 5 wyif, k3; repeat from * to last 4 sts, k1, k2tog, k1.

Row 2. (WS) K2, p1, * k3, p5; repeat from * to last 5 sts, k3, kfb, k1.  65 sts

Row 3.  K1, kfb, k4, *k2, Butterfly, k5; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Row 4.  K2, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k3, p2, kfb, k1.  66 sts

Row 5.  K1, kfb, k6, *sl 5 wyif, k3; repeat from * to last 10 sts, sl 5 wyif, k2, k2tog, k1.

Row 6.  K1, *k3, p5: repeat from * to last 9 sts, k3, p4, kfb, k1.  67 sts

Row 7.  K1, kfb, k8, *k2, Butterfly, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k2, Butterfly, k3, k2tog, k1.

Row 8.  *K3, p5; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, kfb, k1.  68 sts

Row 9.  K1, kfb, k2, *sl 5 wyif, k3; repeat from * to last 8 sts, sl 5 wyif, k2tog, k1.

Row 10.  K2, p5, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 5 sts, k3, kfb, k1.  69 sts

Row 11.  K1, kfb, k4, *k2, Butterfly, k5; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k2, Butterfly, k1, k2tog, k1.

Row 12.  K2, p4, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k3, p2, kfb, k1.  70 sts

Row 13.  K1, kfb, k6, *sl 5 wyif, k3; repeat from * to last 6 sts, k3, k2tog, k1.

Row 14.  K2, p3, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k3, p4, kfb, k1.  71 sts

Row 15.  K1, kfb, k8, *k2, Butterfly, k5; repeat from * to last 5 sts, k2, k2tog, k1.

Row 16.  K2, p2, *k3, p5; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, kfb, k1.  72 sts

Row 17.  Same as 1.                                                    Row 25.  Same as 9.

Row 18.  Same as 2.  73 sts                                        Row 26.  Same as 10.  77 sts

Row 19.  Same as 3.                                                    Row 27.  Same as 11.

Row 20.  Same as 4.  74 sts                                        Row 28.  Same as 12.  78 sts

Row 21.  Same as 5.                                                    Row 29.  Same as 13.

Row 22.  Same as 6.  75 sts                                        Row 30.  Same as 14.  79 sts

Row 23.  Same as 7.                                                    Row 31.  Same as 15.

Row 24.  Same as 8.  76 sts                                        Row 32.  Same as 16.  80 sts

First skein of CC = 23g

Do NOT cut CC yarn as it will be used in next week’s Section #4.

 

Little Gulls Chart

8-stitch repeat between red lines, work Rows 1-16 twice.  (Don’t forget to work Set Up rows prior to beginning chart)

 

 

 

Last KAL – Starts October 10th!

If you love to “try out” new stitch patterns, then Audition is a KAL you won’t want to miss!  This generously sized asymmetrical shawl debuts four unique stitch patterns.  Each pattern features interesting stitches along with improved ways to execute old standards.

The shawl is knit using the lovely shades of Simplicity Spray by HiKoo and is paired with two skeins of solid HiKoo Simplicity.  (Both of these solid skeins MUST be the same color). Simplicity Spray is wound in huge 200 gram cakes and dyed with a brand new technique for an exceptional color palette.

While the shawl design is a mystery, it is no secret that video tutorials and daily support are available all throughout the knit along.

This will be my last KAL for now as I take a sabbatical to spend time with my ever-expanding family.  Have no worries!  While I am globetrotting and rocking babies, my website and videos will remain in place to assist you.  I will continue to monitor the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry where I’ve made many new friends.

I can’t wait to share the yarn, stitches and good times together!

 

Materials

  • Main Color (MC) – simplicity Spray by HiKoo, 55% merino superwash, 28% acrylic, 17% nylon, 200 g/456 yds, 1 skein
  • Contrasting Color (CC) – simplicity by HiKoo, 55% merino superwash, 28% acrylic, 17% nylon, 50 g/117 yds, 2 skeins
  • US #7 (4.5mm) addi 24-32” circular needle

Very important!  Be sure to purchase Simplicity Spray and not Simpliworsted Spray.  They are different yardages and gauges.  The contrasting color must be two skeins of the same solid color of Simplicity.

Gauge

Approximately 20 stitches and 41 rows = 4” in garter stitch, unblocked

Size

Asymmetrical triangle, approximately 16” deep and 67” at longest edge

Cable Channel – Part 4

With the knitting behind us, it’s time to seam the fabric for a pillow you will be proud to display.  I have a comprehensive video that will take you through every step of the pillow seaming process.  From pinning, seaming, and sewing on buttons, my Pillow Seaming video will take the guess work out of finishing.  A brief description and additional photos are included in this post.

Begin by laying the fabric face down.  Center the pillow form over the wrong side of the Front.  The lifelines at the bottom and top of the Front will help to center the form.  Fold the bottom button band up over the pillow.  Next, overlap the top buttonhole band over the lower half and secure with pins.  Do not pin the knitting to the form.  Try to overlap by at least 1 1/2 to 2″.  I stretched my fabric a bit to get a nice snug fit.  It is perfectly fine if your piece has more of an overlap.

Remove the pillow form and pin the sides together.  In a perfect world, the lifelines will mark the top and bottom of the front but if your length was adjusted that is completely fine.  Just begin the side seam at the fold where YOUR Front meets your adjusted edge.

With a piece of the project yarn approximately 56″ long threaded onto a tapestry needle, begin seaming the side seam at the lower edge of the Front.  Bring the needle from the wrong side to the right side leaving a 6″ tail that can be buried in the seam later.  The seam is closed using the Mattress Stitch.  My video will take newbie seamers through this essential knitting skill.  Unlike standard seaming, beware that the “V”s run in opposite directions due to the folded fabric.  Try not to overthink this!  Pick a stitch column, or “ditch”, on each side of the opening and stick with it up the seam and all be fine.

Work the Mattress Stitch to the overlapped fabric.  Continue with the Mattress Stitch “catching” the lower flap.  Once past the overlap, proceed with the seaming to the top of the pillow.  Bring the tapestry needle to the inside of the pillow and bury the tail in the newly created seam.  Repeat the process for the other side seam.  This is ALL demonstrated in my Pillow Seaming video and is really quite simple to do.

Remove the lifelines and place the pillow form inside of the seamed piece.  Mark the button placement with removable markers.

Unfold the flaps to reveal the marked button positions.  You can remove the pillow form if desired for easy sewing.

I prefer to use thread when sewing on buttons because it is stronger than most yarn.  Also, buttons often have holes that are too small to accommodate the yarn.  However, if you can pull the yarn through the button, it is perfectly acceptable to use it.  If using yarn, I do recommend using a product like Fray Check to secure the knot of yarn on the back of the button.  Once the buttons are sewn in securely, replace the pillow form and button the back closed.

An optional finish is to add tassels to the corners of the pillow.  Tassels are the hottest thing in home decor and I just knew that I wanted to add them to my pillow.  Tassels are super simple to make especially using my Tassels video.  With 25g remaining in my 4th skein, I made four 5g tassels.  I cut a piece of cardboard to a height of 3 1/2″ inches and wrapped the yarn around it 60 times.  If you have less yarn, you can wrap fewer times to conserve the yardage.  After making the tassels, I steamed them to smooth out any squiggly strands of yarn.  Warning: tassels are addicting and you’ll want to add them to everything!

A condensed, pattern-only version of Cable Channel is available here and on Ravelry.  The pattern is free through May 31st and then will only be available for purchase on Ravelry.

Pillows completed by May 31st are eligible for the Skacel Collection prize drawing.  First prize is a set of addi Click interchangeable needles!  Please enter the drawing as it is the only way our sponsor knows if you are knitting with us.  Entries = more KALs!!!!!  The entry form is available here.

As always, I am so thrilled to be a part of your knitting.  I have enjoyed reading your posts and following each one of you.  I will be back in October for another KAL full of new knitting experiences.  Be sure to subscribe to my newsletter to stay up to date on all of the upcoming details.

Many thank for knitting along,

Michelle

Part Four

Click here to download printable version

Finishing – See Pillow Seaming Video

Weave in ends and block piece if desired.  Note:  Kenzie blooms and softens with wet blocking.

 

Place pillow on top of wrong side of Front.

Fold piece at lifelines, overlapping Buttonhole Band by 2”.  (Piece may need to be stretched to overlap edges which creates a nice snug fit.) Pin in place and remove pillow form.

Pin sides together through all thicknesses.

 

Beginning at lower Front edge and using Mattress Stitch, close side seams catching overlapped Button Band.  See Mattress Stitch Video

Insert pillow form and sew buttons into place on Button Band.

 

If desired, make four tassels with remaining yarn and attach to corners.  See Tassel Video

(My tassels were made according to video over 3 ½” cardboard and wrapping yarn 60 times.  Each tassel used 5g of yarn.)

 

Cable Channel – Part 3

With our lovely pillow front complete, it is time to knit the top half of the back of the pillow known as the buttonhole band.  This section will overlap the lower back and include the buttonholes to close the pillow.  Previous fans will recognize my signature cable-centered buttonholes.  I love how the buttons will nestle inside of the diamonds for a polished finish.

Be sure to place a lifeline through the last row of the pillow front prior to beginning the buttonhole band to aid in centering the pillow in the finishing and to protect your hard work.

This section marks a return to the Twisted Rib as worked in Section A.  Work the Twisted Rib until the rib measures 7″ from the lifeline or 2″ shorter than the desired length. The upcoming cabled buttonhole section will measure approximately 2″ to add to the length for a total of 9″ from the end of the front to the bind off.  The goal is have the top overlap the bottom by about 1 1/2 to 2″.

If your pillow front was slightly longer or shorter than mine, you will need to adjust this length.  I recommend stretching your piece over the pillow form to assess your required length.  Pillow forms vary in the amount of filling so it is best to test the knitting on your form.  If your pillow front is longer, then knit the rib section shorter.  If your front is shorter, then knit the rib section longer.  The yarn and ribbing are very stretchy and it is easy to get a great fit.  I stretched the fabric quite a bit over my pillow form for a snug fit.

Prior to beginning the buttonhole section, place another lifeline through the last row of ribbing.  This lifeline will be handy need to go back and alter the length after completing the buttonholes.

My favorite buttonhole is a one-row style that is sturdy and tidy.  The buttonholes are tucked inside of the diamond cables that are similar to those on the front of the pillow.  The buttonholes are five stitches wide to accommodate the pretty buttons you have chosen.  My Buttonhole video will walk you through all of the buttonhole steps.  The video shows a three stitch buttonhole, but it is the same procedure over any number of stitches.

The final few rows of the buttonhole section contain some oddly placed purl stitches along the top edge.  This is not a mistake in the pattern!  These stitches help keep the bind off edge from flaring.  Just trust the pattern and work as directed.

Finally the stitches are bound off in pattern.  This is typically described as work the knits in knit and the purls in purl while executing the standard bind off. The same holds true here.  Just remember that left and right twists are considered knit stitches so treat both of the twist stitches as knit.  This final edge treatment will keep the edge clean and sophisticated.

My fourth skein weighed 26 grams after binding off leaving plenty for tassels.  My four tassels used 5g of yarn each for those keeping track of yardage.

The above photo shows my completed piece unblocked.  I chose to block the fabric for several reasons.  The fiber content of Kenzie allows the yarn to soften and bloom after a wet blocking.  Blocking also allowed me to coax any stubborn stitches into shape and create a defined sharp top and bottom edge.  As you can see below, I ran blocking wire though the the cast on and bind off edges for a razor sharp edge.  Pins were sufficient for the sides to keep the width to approximately 13″.  For wet blocking you can either pin into place and then spray with water or give the fabric a bath before pinning.  My Blocking video will walk any newbies through the process.

Next week I will have a comprehensive pillow seaming video ready for your viewing.  It will walk you through every step of the finishing process to give you a professional-looking pillow.  I will also address those adorable tassels!

Until next week, happy knitting!

Michelle

Part Three

Click here to download printable version

Buttonhole (5-stitch) – Sl 1 wyif, (sl 1 wyib, psso) 4 times, return the last bind off stitch to left hand needle, turn.  Using Cable Cast On, cast on 5 stitches, turn.  Sl 1 wyib from left hand needle, pass last cast on stitch over this stitch and off the needle.  See Buttonhole Video

For all Cables See Cables Video

C1BK2 – slip next stitch onto cable needle and hold in back of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then k1 from cable needle.

C1BK2P – slip next stitch onto cable needle and hold to back of work, k2, p1 from cable needle.

C2FK1 – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold to front of work, knit next stitch from left hand needle, k2 from cable needle.

C2FPK2 – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold to front of work, p1, k2 from cable needle.

C4B – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle.

C4F – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle. cn – cable needle.

LT (Left Twist) – slip as if to knit, slip as if to knit, return both slipped stitches to left needle.  Knit second stitch through the back loop, then knit both stitches together through the back loop.  See Left Twist – Mirror Image to Right Twist Video

RT (Right twist) – knit two stitches together and without taking stitches off left hand needle, reknit the first stitch and remove both stitches from left hand needle.

See Right Twist Video

Section C – Buttonhole Band

Place lifeline through last row of Front to aid in later finishing.

Work Twisted Rib as on Button Band until piece measures 7” from conclusion of Front ending after Row 2.  (I joined 4th skein when section measured 5”.)

Twisted Rib – mult. of 13 + 10, 2 rows (See Chart A below)

Row 1. (RS) K7, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k4; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 2. (WS) P3, *p4, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 7 sts, p7.

Buttonhole Cable – mult. of 26 + 23, 14 rows  (See Chart C below)

Work the following 14 rows once ending after Row 14.

Row 1. (RS)  K7, p1, C1BK2, k1, C2FK1, p1, k4, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k4, p1, C1BK2, k1, C2FK1, p1, k4; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 2.  (WS). P3, *p7, k3, p7, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p7, k3, p10.

Row 3.  K7, C1BK2, k3, C2FK1, k4, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k4, C1BK2, k3, C2FK1, k4; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 4.  P3, *p6, k5, p6, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p6, k5, p9.

Row 5.  K6, C1BK2, k5, C2FK1, k3, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k3, C1BK2, k5, C2FK1, k3; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 6.  P3, *p5, k7, p5, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p5, k7, p8.

Row 7.  K4, C4F, k1, buttonhole, k1, C4B, k1, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k1, C4F, k1, buttonhole, k1, C4B, k1; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 8.  P3, *p5, k7, p5, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p5, k7, p8.

Row 9.  K6, C2FK1, k5, C1BK2, k3, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k3, C2FK1, k5, C1BK2, k3; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 10.  P3, *p6, k5, p6, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p6, k5, p9.

Row 11.  K7, C2FK1, k3, C1BK2, k4, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k4, C2FK1, k3, C1BK2, k4; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 12.  P3, *p7, k3, p7, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p7, k3, p10.

Row 13.  K7, p1, C2FK1, k1, C1BK2, p1, k4, *p2, RT, p1, LT, p2, k4, p1, C2FK1, k1, C1BK2, p1, k4; repeat from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 14.  P3, *p4, k2, p5, k2, p4, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2; repeat from * to last 20 sts, p4, k2, p5, k2, p7.

 

Bind off stitches in pattern.  See Bind Off in Pattern video

(My 4th skein weighed 26g after bind off)