Namesake – Part 4

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Our lovely textured cowl is knit and ready for the bind off!  If you are like me, I’m always fussing with cowls to hide the less attractive wrong side from view.  Fuss no more!  In keeping with the reversible theme, I have devised a bind off to mimic the Channel Island Cast On to make Namesake reversible from every angle.

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In searching for the perfect bind off edge, I experimented with every picot bind off that I could find and none of them produced the same nubby effect as the cast on.  I finally morphed a picot bind off with a decrease bind off and was quite happy with the results.  Below is a photo of the two techniques – Channel Island Cast On is on the lower stitches and its paired bind off on the upper stitches.  I hope you will be as pleased as I am!

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The Channel Island Bind Off, like its counterpart, has several steps – but again, so worth the effort!  I have written out the instructions for you, but have a detailed video in place to help you finish in style.  See Channel Island Bind Off Video

Like many knitters learning new techniques, the tension in your cast on may be firm.  Any size discrepancies between the cast on and bind off edges can be easily corrected with blocking.  I recommend giving your cowl a bath in cool water and then laying flat to dry.  For a stubborn edge, try using some pins to help coax it into the desired shape.  If you are new to blocking, start by watching my Blocking video.

No matter which size you chose, wear your reversible beauty and be proud of all you have accomplished!  Pictured below are the Medium in Grassy (shown single and doubled), the Small in Grey Flannel and the Large in Deep Turquoise (doubled).

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Thank you again for knitting with me!  I enjoy following your progress and celebrating with you as you master new techniques.  I am humbled by your leap of faith as you continue to knit these mystery projects.  I hope you will join me in January for Endgame, a gorgeous new pattern to grow your skills.  Scroll down to the end of the post for more details.

Happy knitting,

Michelle

Part Four

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_instructions

Bind Off using Channel Island Picot Bind Off. See Channel Island Bind Off Video

Channel Island Bind Off

1.  Cast on 2 sts using the Knitted Cast On.

2.  With right needle tip, lift the second stitch on the left needle over the first stitch and off the needle.

3.  With right needle tip, lift the now-second stitch on the left needle over the first and off the needle.

4.  Slip the first stitch to the right needle as if to purl.

5.  On left needle, k2tog. There are now 2 stitches on right needle.

6.  On right needle, lift the right stitch over the left stitch and off the needle.

7.  Slip the stitch on the right needle to the left needle.

Repeat Steps 1 – 7 to last stitch. Cut yarn and pull tail through last stitch.

KPHtemplate_confessionsKnit

Knit and Purl –

Two simple stitches with endless possibilities!

©2014 Michelle Hunter

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January KAL – Endgame

Kick off the New Year with a gorgeous cabled scarf – Endgame. The pattern is full of beautiful stitches enhanced by the lovely tweed yarn, Kenzie.  End Game’s unisex design introduces a cast on and bind off new to the series along with other essential techniques. Continue to grow your knitting skills while creating a classic, yet modern, scarf.

Kenzie just may be the perfect tweed. New Zealand merino, angora and alpaca lend softness and body, nylon lends strength and silk noils contribute delicate texture and color accents. The smooth, round 3-ply yarn knits into a cohesive fabric that blooms when wet blocked. The angora haze is just fuzzy enough to lend a cozy feel, but not so fuzzy that it will obscure any stitch patterning. Kenzie is available in 30 beautiful colors – the hardest part is choosing just one!

Subscribe to my newsletter to receive an email reminder for the KAL – you won’t want to miss this one!

KPHtemplate_materials

  • Kenzie by HiKoo, 50% New Zealand merino, 25% nylon, 10% angora, 10% alpaca, 5% silk noils, 3(4) skeins – all the same color
  • Waste yarn -contrasting color in a similar weight to Kenzie, 10 yards
  • US #6 (4mm) needles or size needed to obtain gauge
  • US #7 (4.5mm) needles or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Cable needle
  • Tapestry needle

KPHtemplate_size

Approximately 6 ½” wide, 56 (70)” long.

KPHtemplate_gauge

20 stitches = 4” in stockinette using larger needle.

Posted in Namesake | 4 Responses

Namesake – Part 3

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Wasn’t the Right Turn in last week’s section fun to knit?  I love how the twist played with the knits and purls to create a reversible pinwheel.

Part Three brings us the reverse of the design in Part One.  These stitches flow up from the center of the pinwheel to mirror the design below.  The best part – the cowl is reversible on both sides and upside down!

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Work this week’s short knit and try to wait patiently for next week.  Our last clue will bring you a new bind off to finish the cowl perfectly!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

Part Three

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_instructions

Rounds 45-56 may be worked from written instructions or from chart found below.

45.  P6, *k6, p6; repeat from * to last 6 sts in round, k6.

46.  P5, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p1 instead of p6.

47.  P4, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p2 instead of p6.

48.  P3, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p3 instead of p6.

49.  P2, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p4 instead of p6.

50.  P1, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p5 instead of p6.

51.  Same as Round 50.

52.  P2, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p4 instead of p6.

53.  P3, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p3 instead of p6.

54.  P4, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p2 instead of p6.

55.  P5, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p1 instead of p6.

56.  P6, *k6, p6; repeat from * to last 6 sts in round, k6.

 

57.  Knit.

58.  Purl.

59.  Knit.

60.  Purl.

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Posted in Namesake | 18 Responses

Namesake – Part 2

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With the oh-so-beautiful Channel Island Cast On behind us, it is time to turn our attention to the main section of the cowl.  The design continues to focus on knit and purl stitches.  I am always amazed at the myriad of stitch patterns that can be made from these two simple stitches.

Before continuing with the next section, I recommend placing a Lifeline through the stitches to safeguard your hard earned work from Part One.  See Lifeline Video

The center of this section features a little used cousin to the cable stitch known as a Right Turn.  Like a cable stitch, stitches in a Right Turn are slipped to a cable needle.  Then, the cable needle is rotated 180 degrees counterclockwise.  Following this turn, the stitches are then worked directly off of the cable needle.  The Right Turn gives a twist to the stitches and simulates a cable.  In Namesake, we slip 4 stitches to the cable needle, turn counterclockwise and then work a k2, p2 from the cable needle.  The stitches on the cable needle will seem to be seated incorrectly, but resist the urge to untwist them to preserve the desired appearance.  It’s a quick and fun technique that I think you will enjoy.  Check out my Right Turn /Left Turn Video to “turn” a little bit of charm into your cowl.  The video also demonstrates the Left Turn which you may want to incorporate into a future project.

While Part Two is comprised of a fairly simple repeat, I found it very helpful to place a marker between the stitch repeats – every 12 sts.   Use markers that are a different color than your beginning of the round marker to eliminate confusion.  This sectioning of the stitch repeats will help to minimize errors.

As promised in last week’s post, the knitting is clear sailing from now on.  I especially like that with the exception of Round 32 (which directly follows the Right Turn round) every even numbered round is the same as its preceding round.  Hurray for mindless knitting!

Part Two may be worked from the written or charted instructions.  If knitting from the chart, notice that it does not include any edge stitches as found in Part One’s chart.  Simply work all 12 stitches in the chart, repeating until the end of the round.  Remember, every round is worked from right to left in circular knitting.

As you complete Part Two, take the time to admire our completely reversible work.  Below is a peek at this week’s stitch pattern.

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What is in store for next week?  See you on October 16th to find out!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

RTn – (Right Turn) Slip 4 stitches to cable needle, turn cable needle 180° counterclockwise, k2, p2 from cable needle. See Right Turn/Left Turn Video

KPHtemplate_instructions

Click here to download printable version

At this point, I recommend placing markers every 12 sts for easy tracking of each repeat. Be sure that these markers are not the same color as the beginning of the round marker.

Work Rounds 17-44 from written instructions below or chart found below.

17.  *K6, p6; repeat from * to end of round.

18.  Same as Round 17.

19.  *K5, p1, k1, p5; repeat from * to end of round.

20.  Same as Round 19.

21.  *K4, p2, k2, p4; repeat from * to end of round.

22.  Same as Round 21.

23.  *K3, p3; repeat from * to end of round.

24.  Same as Round 23.

25.  *K2, p4, k4, p2; repeat from * to end of round.

26.  Same as Round 25.

27.  *K1, p5, k5, p1; repeat from * to end of round.

28.  Same as Round 27.

29.  *P6, k6; repeat from * to end of round.

30.  Same as Round 29.

31.  *K4, RTn, p4; repeat from * to end of round.

32.  *K6, p6; repeat from * to end of round.

33.  *P1, k5, p5, k1; repeat from * to end of round.

34.  Same as Round 33.

35.  *P2, k4, p4, k2; repeat from * to end of round,

36.  Same as Round 35.

37.  *P3, k3; repeat from * to end of round.

38.  Same as Round 37.

39.  *P4, k2, p2, k4; repeat from * to end of round.

40.  Same as Round 39.

41.  *P5, k1, p1, k5; repeat from * to end of round.

42.  Same as Round 41.

43.  *P6, k6; repeat from * to end of round.

44.  Same as Round 43.

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Posted in Namesake | 19 Responses

Namesake – Part 1

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Welcome to the October 2014 installment of the Progressive Needles Knit Along sponsored by Skacel Collection!  We kick off the Fall knitting season with, Namesake, a delightful cowl that will ward off the autumn chill in style.  Simplinatural’s cozy softness and superior stitch definition make it the perfect yarn for our cowl.  As always, the KAL is full of new tips and techniques to grow your knitting skills.  So get comfy in your favorite knitting chair and let’s work some magic!

Before we begin, here’s a quick overview of how the KAL works:

  • A portion of the 4-part mystery pattern is revealed here on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Thursday in October.  The weekly pattern, video resources and lots of helpful tips are included in each post.  An abbreviated, pattern-only version is included to download.
  • All techniques are supported with video instruction at knitpurlhunter.com
  • All questions and comments are monitored daily both here and in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.  It’s like having  your own private knitting tutor!
  • Projects completed by November 15 are eligible for the monthly prize drawing – first prize is a set of addi Clicks!  See skacelknitting.com for all the info.

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I’m very excited to introduce you to the Channel Island Cast On as the first step in Namesake.  This charming cast on adds a picot-like edge and is the hallmark of sweaters which originated in the middle islands of the English Channel.  Today it is used as a handsome foundation for garter stitch and k1, p1 rib.  The Channel Island Cast On (CICO) is a bit more finicky than its cousin the Long Tail Cast On – but, so worth the effort.  As with all new knitting skills, I recommend that you practice the cast on with large needles using smooth, light colored yarn.  I promise that this is the most difficult technique in the cowl.  Once the beautiful cast on stitches are nestled on your needles, it will be smooth sailing to the finish.

I have a fabulous new video to walk you through the steps of the CICO, but will provide a brief overview and some helpful tips here.  See Channel Island Cast On video.

Like the Long Tail cast on, the stitches are formed from the working yarn and from a tail.  The hand set-up is much like the Long Tail cast on with yarn over the forefinger and the thumb.  The major difference is that the CICO uses three strands of yarn to form the stitches.  One strand is over the forefinger and a double strand of yarn is wound twice around the thumb.  This doubled strand of yarn MUST be wound counterclockwise around the thumb for correct execution.

It is very important to note that the Channel Island Cast On produces pairs of stitches.  The completion of its steps will place two stitches on the needle.  Each stitch in the pair is counted toward the final cast on number.

Begin with a long tail of doubled yarn.  (Yarn tail length is addressed below.)  Make a slipknot with the doubled yarn and place it on the needle held in the right hand – this is counted as the first two stitches.  Mark these two stitches together with a marker for later use.  *On the left hand, drape the single working yarn over the forefinger and wind the doubled tail strand counterclockwise around the thumb.  Move the needle tip over the forefinger’s single strand and behind it, scooping up the yarn onto the needle – it will look much like a yarn over.  Next, bring the needle under the strands on the thumb from bottom to top.  Move the needle tip over the single strand on the forefinger and behind it, once again scooping up the yarn.  Bring this newest “scoop” down through the strands on the thumb from top to bottom.  Release the strands off of the thumb, tightening the resulting stitch under the needle.  You have cast on two stitches – the first resembles a yarn over and the second resembles a knot.  Take care that the stitches are not cast on too tightly to provide some elasticity.

Repeat the above steps from the * until the desired number of stitches are cast on.  When counting the stitches, remember that the double-stranded slipknot is to be counted as two stitches.  For Namesake, the cast on stitches are joined in the round to knit our cowl circularly.  The knitting is worked with the single strand of yarn coming from the source off the forefinger.  The remaining tails are no longer needed and may be woven in.  Remove the marker from the doubled slipknot and place it on the right hand needle to serve as the beginning of the round marker.  Join the stitches in the round by knitting into each of the two slipknot strands to maintain the required stitch count.  See Join in the Round video.  As a side note, if a pattern requires an odd number of stitches using the CICO, simply knit the two slipknot strands together reducing the stitch count by 1.

As with the Long Tail cast on method, the CICO requires a lengthy tail but instead with its tail doubled.  I demonstrate the tail length calculation at the end of the Channel Island Cast On video for your handy reference, but I provide an overview here.

If you have 3 balls of yarn, a strand from each skein could be used for the cast on.  With 2 balls of yarn, work one skein from both the inside and the outside of the skein to yield two strands used in conjunction with a single strand from the second skein.  The extra skeins are cut after the cast on and the piece is knit with the single strand from the forefinger’s skein.  I find both of these methods fiddly and of no use when knitting from one skein.  I prefer to calculate the tail length with some simple math.  Place a double slipknot onto the needle and cast on an additional 20 stitches.  Carefully remove the 20 stitches and measure the length of the double tail used to form these stitches.  This will provide you with the length of doubled yarn needed for each 20 stitches.  Round the number of required cast on stitches for your project to the nearest multiple of 20.  The doubled tail yarn needed for the complete cast on will be the length of the measured double strand multiplied by the number of multiples of 20 in the final count.

For example, when making the Small size of Namesake, 96 cast on stitches are needed.  Let’s say that my measured tail from 20 CICO stitches used 10″ of double yarn.  I will round the 96 required cast on stitches to 100 – the nearest multiple of 20.  There are 5 multiples of 20 in 100.  5 multiples times 10″ = 50″ of doubled yarn needed for the cast on.  For this example, pull out 100″ of yarn (plus a few extra inches to be safe) and double it for the needed 50″ tail length.  The pattern is designed with ample yardage so wasting a bit of yarn is not a worry.

As promised, the circumference of the cowl may be adjusted to suit your style.  The pattern is written for Small (Medium, Large) for a circumference of 20 (40, 60)”  You may adjust this measurement by altering the number of cast on stitches.  The cowl uses a multiple of 12 sts with each multiple measuring approximately 2 1/2″ inches wide in the stated gauge.

  • Small cowl uses 96 sts divided by the 12-stitch multiple = 8 repeats.  8 repeats multiplied by 2 1/2″ = 20″.
  • Medium cowl uses 192 sts divided by the 12-stitch multiple = 16 repeats.  16 repeats multiplied by 2 1/2″ = 40″.
  • Large cowl uses 288 sts divided by the 12-stitch multiple = 24 repeats.  24 repeats multiplied by 2 1/2″ = 60″.

To change the circumference, divide the desired circumference by 2 1/2″ (2.5) and round to the nearest whole number.  This is the number of repeats needed for your chosen dimension.  Multiply the number of repeats by 12 to determine the number of stitches required for your adjusted size.

For example:

  • Desired circumference is 32″.
  • 32 divided by 2.5 = 12.8, rounded to nearest whole number = 13 repeats needed.
  • 13 repeats X 12 sts = 156 sts  used for this adjusted size.

With the cast on stitches completed, we begin by working garter stitch in the round.  It is interesting to note that when knit flat, garter stitch is achieved by knitting every row.  In circular knitting, as used here in Rounds 1-4, garter stitch is achieved with alternating knit and purl rounds.  I recommend placing a lifeline after these simple rounds to safeguard the precious cast on stitches below.  See Lifeline video.

I’m happy to announce that Namesake is a completely reversible cowl!  I recommend pinning a marker to the right side (the outside of the tube you are knitting) to avoid confusion.  It is so easy to start knitting on the wrong side or in the wrong direction without this handy reminder.

Rounds 5-16 may be worked from the written instructions or from the chart that follows.  In a chart for circular knitting, all rounds are read from right to left.  Begin the round with the stitches to the right of the bold line.  These are known as the edge stitches.  Repeat the stitches within the bold lines as many times as is necessary until the number of stitches to the left of the bold lines remain.  Work these remaining stitches.  If you are new to charts, try decoding the chart using the written instructions to self-check.

Below is a photo of Part One completed and off the needles resting on a lifeline for easy viewing.

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I am happy to answer your questions!  Feel free to post them here or in the Ravelry group where lots of fellow KALers chat and share photos.

Part 2 will be posted next Thursday, October 9th, and features a unique cable technique.

Until then, happy knitting,

Michelle

Namesake – Part One

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_materials

  • Simplinatural by HiKoo, 40% baby alpaca/40% fine merino wool/20% mulberry silk, 183 yds/100g. 1 (2, 3) skeins.
  • US #8 (5mm) circular needle 16 (24-40)” or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Cable needle
  • Markers

KPHtemplate_gauge

Approximately 18 sts = 4” in stockinette.

KPHtemplate_size

Small (1 skein) – 20” circumference. Medium (2 skeins) – 40” circumference. Large (3 skeins) – 60” circumference.

KPHtemplate_instructions

With US #8 circular needles, cast on 96 (192, 288) or desired number of stitches using Channel Island Cast On.  See Channel Island Cast On Video

NOTE:  If adjusting the stitch count, the number of cast on stitches must be a multiple of 12.

Place marker and join in the round taking care not to twist the stitches. See Join in the Round Video

All stitches are worked in the round.

TIP:  We are creating a reversible fabric – pin a marker to the Right Side of the piece to avoid confusion.

Round 1.  Knit.

Round 2.  Purl.

Round 3.  Knit.

Round 4.  Purl.

Rounds 5- 16 may be worked from written or charted instructions below.

5.  *K6, p6; repeat from * to end of round.

6.  P1, * k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p5 instead of p6.

7.  P2, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p4 instead of p6.

8.  P3, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p3 instead of p6.

9.  P4, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p2 instead of p6.

10.  P5, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p1 instead of p6.

11.  Same as Round 10.

12.  P4, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p2 instead of p6.

13.  P3, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p3 instead of p6.

14.  P2, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p4 instead of p6.

15.  P1, *k6, p6; repeat from * ending last repeat p5 instead of p6.

16.  *K6, p6; repeat from * to end of round.

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Posted in Namesake | Tagged | 27 Responses

New KAL Coming Soon!

October KAL – Namesake

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Join me October 2nd for a fabulous cowl featuring the luxurious yarn, Simplinatural. The exquisite softness and superior stitch definition of this yarn is perfect to showcase the unique design. I’m excited to share techniques new to the series including a brand new bind off that I created! The cowl is available in three sizes and the circumference may be adjusted to suit your style.

There is no registration and the knit along is FREE!  Simply return here at 9am EDT on October 2nd for the first portion of our mystery pattern.  Prizes are generously provided by our sponsor, Skacel Collection.

KPHtemplate_size

Small: 1 skein = cowl up to 20″ circumference.

Medium: 2 skeins = cowl up to 40″ circumference.

Large: 3 skeins = cowl up to 60″ circumference.

KPHtemplate_materials

  • Simplinatural by HiKoo, 40% baby alpaca/40% fine merino wool/20% mulberry silk, 183 yds/100g. 1 (2, 3) skeins.
  • US #8 (5mm) circular needle 16 (24-40)” or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Cable needle
  • Markers

KPHtemplate_gauge Approx. 18 sts = 4″ in stockinette.

 

Posted in KAL News, Uncategorized | 44 Responses