Cableship – October KAL!

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Cables and I have long had a deep, loving relationship that I refer to as a “cableship”.  I bring the yarn and needles, while the cables bring the power to make my heart sing!

Join me October 6th for my next mystery knit along, Cableship.  This toe up sock pattern is full of great cable techniques, but also includes a heel new to the series.  Yes, I have uncovered another method for simple sock success!

I designed Cableship to showcase the vibrant hues of Zauberball sock yarn.  The sock knits up beautifully in every shade of this rich, gradient yarn.  My video tutorials and daily interaction make the sock knitting a snap.  The only hard part will be choosing just one color of Zauberball!

The KAL is FREE and no registration is required.  Simply go to knitpurlhunter.com anytime after 9 am on October 6th to download the first installment of the pattern.  I answer questions daily on my website and in my Ravelry group.

Prizes are generously provided by our sponsor, Skacel Collection.

Materials

  • Zauberball Socks, 75%wool/25%nylon, 100g/459 yards, 1 skein
  • US #2 (2.75mm) or size necessary to achieve desired gauge.  Pattern may be knit with double points, two circulars or Magic Loop method.
  • Cable needle
  • Markers

Gauge

Approx. 8 sts = 1″ in stockinette

Size

Small, Medium and Large.
Small – leg circumference measures approximately 5” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 10”.
Medium – leg circumference measures approximately 6” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 12”.
Large – leg circumference measures approximately 7” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 14”.

Further size adjustment may be made by changing needle sizes.

Posted in Cableship, Uncategorized | 33 Responses

Scoreboard 2.0

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Click here to download printable version

Questions are also monitored daily through the end of the season in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.

KPHtemplate_materials

Featured Yarn

HiKoo Simplicity, 55% Merino superwash, 28% acrylic, 17% nylon; 117 yds / 50g; uses two team colors, approx. 3 (6) skeins each.

Optional – one skein of a third color for a visual break between games.

addi Needles

Two 4.5mm (approx. US 7) 16” circular needles

(Second needle is needed to graft stitches using Kitchener Stitch)

Additional Notions

Tapestry needle, stitch marker, approx. 1 yd of waste yarn, Size G crochet hook – for provisional cast on

KPHtemplate_gauge

21 stitches and 27 rounds = 4” in Stockinette Stitch

KPHtemplate_size

Small (Large)

Average cowl is 8” wide, approx. 40 (94)” around.

Length around varies with total number of points scored.

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

MC – Main Color. Primary color that represents your favorite team.

CC – Contrasting Color. Secondary color that will always represent the opponent.

CC2 – Contrasting Color 2. Optional third color used to separate games.

Notes

  • Cowl is worked in the two colors of your favorite team.
  • Primary color represents your team (MC).
  • Secondary color will always represent the opponent (CC).
  • All stitches are worked in knit.
  • When changing colors, work the Jogless Stripe technique for smooth color transitions.  See Jogless Stripe video
  • When working stripes that are 4 or more rounds high, carry the unused yarn with the working yarn by twisting the yarns together on the wrong side at the beginning of every 4th round as in photo below.  See Carrying Yarns in Circular Knitting video

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KPHtemplate_instructions

All Sizes

With waste yarn, cast on 80 stitches using a Provisional Cast On.  See Provisional Cast On video

Place marker and join in the round, taking care not to twist the stitches.

Upon completion of first round (as described below), place a Lifeline through the stitches to aid in removal of provisional cast on at end of project. See Lifeline video

Short Version (shown above)

The striping sequence is determined by the order of the scores in each game. Knit two rounds in designated color each time a team scores. A score can be a field goal, touchdown (includes extra point), or safety.

Example game summary:

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds MC

Favorite team scores a field goal – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a field goal – knit 2 rounds CC

Total = 10 rounds knit for game.

Work as above for each game of the season.

 

Long Version (shown below)

The striping sequence is determined by the order and amount of the points scored in each game. Knit one round in designated color every time a team scores a point.

Example game summary:

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 6 rounds MC

Favorite team’s extra point is good – knit 1 round MC

Opponent scores a field goal – knit 3 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a touch down – knit 6 rounds MC

Favorite scores a 2-point conversion – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a touchdown and extra point – knit 7 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a field goal – knit 3 rounds MC

Total = 28 rounds knit for game.

Work rounds based on the points for each game of the season.

 

Both Sizes

If desired, a visual separation between the games of the season can be worked using the optional third color:

  • Option 1 Game Separation: At conclusion of game, and using CC2, knit one round, purl one round, knit one round to denote end of game with a textured break.
  • Option 2 Game Separation: At conclusion of game, and using CC2, knit one round to denote end of game with a small stripe of color 3.

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Finishing

Weave in all ends prior to closing tube.

Break yarn leaving 60” tail.

Using the Lifeline as a guide, thread the second circular needle through Round 1 and remove the waste yarn used for the provisional cast on.

Thread tail onto tapestry needle and close tube by grafting stitches with Kitchener Stitch.  See Kitchener Stitch in the Round video

If desired, weave in the tail onto the Right Side using Duplicate Stitch.  See Duplicate Stitch video

©2016 Michelle Hunter

scoreboardKPH

For an overview of the project, watch my Scoreboard KAL video.

Posted in Scoreboard, Uncategorized | 40 Responses

14 Carat – Part 4

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I’m delighted to reveal the completed poncho!  I love the clean lines, flattering fit and especially that it can be worn over everything.  Let’s wrap up the instructions so you can wear yours soon.

Before seaming, block your piece to the desired dimensions.  As you can see in the photo below, I chose to block mine using blocking wires.  The wires provide straight edges with a minimal amount of pins.

I took a different approach to blocking this than your standard wet blocking.  First, I ran the wires along each edge through the purl stitches in the seed borders.  I placed the wires in the horizontal edges through the cast on or bind off stitches.  Next, I pinned the rectangle to a mat.  (I use the foam flooring squares found at home improvement stores.)  Lastly, I sprayed and sprayed with water until it was completely saturated – I mean really, really wet.  Once soaked, I smoothed any wobbly stitches or uneven yarn overs.  It took a good day to dry completely, but now the poncho is ready for seaming.

14caratblocking

Using the schematic below as a guide, fold the rectangle in half with right sides together.  Pin the edge with the 3 seed border leaving about a 12″ opening for the neck.  I recommend trying on the pinned piece to evaluate the size of the neck opening.

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I laid the poncho flat on a table to begin the seaming process (shown below).  Working with right side up and beginning at the lower edge, seam the seed stitch borders together using the Vertical Seam method leaving a 12″ opening at the top of the seam.  My Vertical Seam video will show you exactly how to close the seam and also how to expertly attach the length of yarn needed to execute the seam.  Thousands of knitters have used it in my Building Blocks book and I know you will adore this no-fail technique.

14caratseaming

Once the seam is complete, slip the poncho on to assess the neck opening before weaving in the seaming yarn.  If necessary, seam a bit more to make the opening smaller or take out a few seaming stitches to make the neck larger.  Weave in the ends through the seam on the wrong side and you are done.  Get ready for a summer of compliments on your beautiful poncho!

All that is left is to enter the prize drawing for your chance to win a set of addi Clicks and other fabulous gifts from our sponsor, Skacel Collection.  Simply complete your poncho and submit the entry along with a photo by May 31st to be eligible.  Each entry communicates that you enjoy the KALs and hope to see them continue.

As always, it is my honor to lead these KALs.  I hope you had fun and maybe learned a thing or two along the way.  Scroll down to see what I have coming next.

Until next time, happy knitting!

Michelle

Part Four

Click here to download

KPHtemplate_instructions

Finishing

Block to desired dimensions. See Blocking or Blocking with Wires video

Using schematic above as a guide, fold garment as shown with wrong sides together. Seam together edges that have Seed 3 (non-diamond edges) using the Vertical Stitch leaving 12” or desired width for neck opening. See Vertical Seam video

Coming Soon from Knit Purl Hunter

Building with Lace

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I’m taking a break from the KALs this summer to work on my new book, Building with Lace.  The skill building series introduces knitters to beautiful lace patterns and techniques all while creating a stunning sampler shawl.  The book will be available in 2017.

Scoreboard 2.0

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The overwhelming success of last year’s Scoreboard KAL demands a second season!  The 2016 version is smaller and quicker to knit, but will still keep you knitting every score of the game.  Scoreboard is a knitted record of YOUR team’s season – follow your favorite pro, college or high school team with your needles.  Details will be announced this summer in time for the August release of the pattern.

October KAL with Knit Purl Hunter

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This fall the Progressive Needles KAL series returns to sock knitting with the FABULOUS Zauberball sock yarn.  This vibrant gradient yarn is popular the world over and I will be bringing you a design to showcase its gorgeous hues.  Only one skein is needed for a pair of socks – stock up early at your local yarn shop!  Be sure to subscribe to my newsletter to receive a supply list and an email reminder of the starting date.

Skacel Summer KAL

Looking for a KAL this summer in my absence?  Skacel has colorwork fingerless mitts to keep you busy.  Click here for all the details.

Posted in 14 Carat | 9 Responses

14 Carat – Part 3

Most of you are slowly working your way to the required length for 14 Carat.  Doesn’t it seem as if the last few repeats are taking forever?  Have no fear, the finishing is almost here and soon you will be stylin’ in your poncho!

It is important to knit the rectangle to the length that best suits YOU.  To determine this measurement, pin the 3 seed edge of the rectangle together leaving about a 12″ opening for the neck as seen in upper right of photo below.  Slip the work in progress over your head to assess the fit, remembering that the upcoming Part 3 will add approximately 5″ to the rectangle.

Too narrow?  Knit more repeats.  Too wide?  Take out a repeat.  Just right?  Buy a lottery ticket because it’s your lucky day:)

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I hope you remembered to eliminate the eyelets in Row 27 in the last repeat of the Body.  This gives symmetry to the border as we work the top diamond border.

Part 3 is a reversal of Part 1 with the diamond border now being followed by a seed stitch edge as seen below.  Bind off somewhat loosely in pattern to match our beautiful crochet cast on.  See Bind Off in Pattern video

14carat#3

Next week’s clue brings the simplest of seaming techniques that even the most novice finisher can master.  I’m excited to reveal the completed poncho!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

Part Three

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

k2tog – knit two together. See K2tog video

[Seed 3] – k1, p1, k1.

[Seed 5] – k1, p1, k1, p1, k1.

SK2P (sl 1, k2tog, psso) – slip next stitch as if to knit, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over decreased stitch and off the needle. Left leaning, double decrease. See SK2P video

ssk – slip next stitch as if to knit, slip next stitch as if to knit, insert left needle into the front of these two slipped stitches from left to right and knit together.  See SSK video

yo – yarn over. See Yarn Over video

KPHtemplate_instructions

Work next 30 rows using Chart A or written instructions below.

Row 1. [Seed 3] k1, *k7, yo, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 2 and ALL wrong side rows through Row 30. [Seed 5] purl to last 3 sts, [seed 3].

Row 3. [Seed 3], k1, *k5, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k4; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 5. [Seed 3], k1, *k4, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, k3; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 7. [Seed 3], k1, *k3, k2tog, yo, k5, yo, ssk, k2; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 9. [Seed 3], k1, *k2, k2tog, yo, k7, yo, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 11. [Seed 3], k1, *k1, k2tog, yo, k9, yo, ssk; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 13. [Seed 3], k1, k2tog, yo, *k11, yo, SK2P, yo; repeat from * working last repeat k11, yo, ssk, k3, [seed 5].

Row 15. [Seed 3], k1, *yo, ssk, k12; repeat from * to last 9 sts, yo, ssk, k2, [seed 5].

Row 17. [Seed 3], k1, *k1, yo, ssk, k9, k2tog, yo; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 19. [Seed 3], k1, *k2, yo, ssk, k7, k2tog, yo, k1; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 21. [Seed 3], k1, *k3, yo, ssk, k5, k2tog, yo, k2; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 23. [Seed 3], k1, *k4, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, k3; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 25. [Seed 3], k1, *k5, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k4; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 27. [Seed 3], k1, *k6, yo, SK2P, yo, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 29. [Seed 3] k1, *k7, yo, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Top Border

Row 1. (RS) K1, p1, k1, knit to last 5 sts, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1.

Row 2. K1, p1, k1, p1, k1, purl to last 3 sts, k1, p1, k1.

Row 3. Same as 1.

Row 4. Same as 2.

Row 5. (RS) *K1, p1; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Row 6. *K1, p1; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Row 7. Same as 5.

Row 8. Same as 6.

Row 9. Same as 5.

Row 10. Same as 6.

Bind off all stitches in pattern. See Bind Off in Pattern video

14carat chartA

Posted in 14 Carat | 12 Responses

14 Carat – Part 2

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The stage has been set for the body of the poncho with the completion of Part One.  Part Two brings the longest section of this pattern.  I’m sure there are a few knitters who can complete it in a week, but for the rest of us mere mortal knitters it will take more time.  Don’t worry, I am here to answer your questions for however long it takes you.  So sit back and enjoy the relaxing knit.

Before beginning the next section, I highly recommend inserting a lifeline through the last row of Part One.  This will protect those hard-earned stitches should any future errors occur.  Better safe than sorry!  I also recommend weighing the remaining yarn in the skein that was used for Part 1.  You will need to save this same amount of yarn for Part 3.

Next, remove the markers that were used for the diamond border.  Part Two has a completely different repeat that makes these markers obsolete.  If you used removable markers just safely unclip them off of the needles.  If your makers are not removable, simply discard them as you work across the first row of Part Two.

For the body, one repeat of the established diamond pattern will flank the left hand side of the work with the center design worked in a simple staggered eyelet.  The seed stitch edges will continue for the entire piece.

With right side facing, a marker MUST be placed before the last 25 stitches of the row to isolate the diamond pattern.  This marker is noted in the written directions and indicated by a red line in the chart.  Having this marker in place makes the stockinette/eyelet design a snap to knit.  I took the opportunity to use one of my “pretty” markers since this marker will remain in place throughout the body.  I found the eyelet design simple to work and chose not to use markers between these repeats.  If you use markers in the eyelet section, they must be rearranged in Row 27 to accommodate the staggered design and then rearranged again for Row 1 – you can see why I didn’t want to bother with this!

***Critical Information***  It is VERY important to note that the first repeat in the body begins with Row 3.  In other words, begin Part Two with Row 3 and continue through Row 28.  The remaining repeats will work Rows 1-28.  The body design is worked 14(16) times – this number includes the first repeat which began with Row 3.  On the last repeat of the body (14th or 16th repeat), the eyelets are eliminated from Row 27 for symmetry.

Customizing the size of the poncho is very straightforward.  The length of the knitted rectangle will be wrapped around the body to form the width of the poncho.  The poncho hangs a bit diagonally on the body which adds some much needed width.  Each repeat is approximately 3″ tall.  If you would like the poncho narrower, then work fewer repeats.  For a wider poncho, work more repeats.  I suggest working about 12 repeats of the body and evaluate its size.  If your row gauge is different than mine it could have an impact on the height of your repeats and will create the need to knit more or fewer repeats.  Part Two should measure 5″ less than your desired length.  (Make sure that you leave enough yarn for Part 3 as stated above.)  A lifeline is a great idea in these last few repeats should you need to rip back in your customization.  It seems small on the needles, but draped diagonally it works out beautifully.  Have faith!

The large eyelets in the body are formed from flanking decreases separated by a double yarn over.  The Double Yarn Over, also know as yo twice, creates two extra strands on the needles.  When these two strands are worked on the following row, a hole substantially larger than a single yarn over is formed.  These larger holes are used in gorgeous openwork patterns and add a bit of interest to the body of the poncho.

For Continental knitters, a double yarn over is made by simply scooping up the working yarn twice, placing two strands on the right hand needle, and then proceeding with the next stitch.

For Western-style knitters, a double yarn over’s execution is determined by the stitches surrounding it.  When a double yarn over is between knit stitches, the working yarn is brought between the needles to the purl position, taken over the top of the right hand needle and then under the needle to the front returning the yarn to the purl position.  One strand has been placed on the right hand needle.  Keep the working yarn in front as the next stitch is knit to form the second strand in the double yarn over.  A K2tog and SSK are considered to be knit stitches and are treated as such in the execution of a double yarn over.

On the row following a double yarn over, the two new strands must each be worked in different stitches to preserve them.  In 14 Carat, the first yarn over in the pair is purled and the second yarn over is purled through the back loop.  See Purl Through the Back Loop video.

A complete lesson on double yarn overs for both styles of knitters is found in my Double Yarn Over (yo twice) video.

Obviously you will need to join skeins as needed in this long section.  The above photo shows where I added my second skein which by coincidence was the beginning of a row.  I joined the remainder of my skeins in the middle of the row where I think is easier to mask the join.  While I do like the Russian Join, the spin in Cobasi does not lend itself to this technique and I wove in my ends on the wrong side in the traditional fashion.  See Weave in Ends video

Until next week, happy knitting!

Michelle

Part Two

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

k2tog – knit two together. See K2tog video

ptbl – purl stitch through the back loop. See Purl Through the Back Loop video

[Seed 3] – k1, p1, k1.

[Seed 5] – k1, p1, k1, p1, k1.

SK2P (sl 1, k2tog, psso) – slip next stitch as if to knit, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over decreased stitch and off the needle. Left leaning, double decrease. See SK2P video

ssk – slip next stitch as if to knit, slip next stitch as if to knit, insert left needle into the front of these two slipped stitches from left to right and knit together.  See SSK video

SM – slip marker.

yo – yarn over. See Yarn Over video

yo twice – yarn over twice. See Double Yarn Over video

KPHtemplate_instructions

Body

With right side facing, place a marker before last 25 stitches in row.

Work Body from written instructions below or using Chart B (below).

***Begin first repeat with Row 3 and continue through Row 28. All following repeats work Rows 1 – 28.***

Row 1. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k9, yo, ssk, k9, [seed 5].

Row 2 and ALL wrong side rows through Row 28. [Seed 5] purl to last 3 sts, [seed 3].

NOTE: For double yarn overs in Rows 14 and 28, purl into first yo and purl second yo through the back loop (ptbl).

Row 3. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k7, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k8, [seed 5].

Row 5. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k6, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, k7, [seed 5].

Row 7. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k5, k2tog, yo, k5, yo, ssk, k6, [seed 5].

Row 9. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k4, k2tog, yo, k7, yo, ssk, k5, [seed 5].

Row 11. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k3, k2tog, yo, k9, yo, ssk, k4, [seed 5].

Row 13. [Seed 3], k13, *ssk, yo twice, k2tog, k10; repeat from * to marker, SM, k2, k2tog, yo, k11, yo, ssk, k3, [seed 5].

Row 15. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k1, k2tog, yo, k13, yo, ssk, k2, [seed 5].

Row 17. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k3, yo, ssk, k9, k2tog, yo k4, [seed 5].

Row 19. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k4, yo, ssk, k7, k2tog, yo k5, [seed 5].

Row 21. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k5, yo, ssk, k5, k2tog, yo k6, [seed 5].

Row 23. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k6, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo k7, [seed 5].

Row 25. [Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k7, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo k8, [seed 5].

Row 27. [Seed 3], k6, *ssk, yo twice, k2tog, k10; repeat from * to 7 sts before marker, ssk, yo twice, k2tog, k3, SM, k8, yo, SK2P, yo, k9, [seed 5]. (See NOTE below for last repeat.)

Work Rows 1-28 14 (16) times (this number includes 1st repeat that began with Row 3) to measure approx. 55 (62)” OR until piece is 5” less than desired length.

**VERY IMPORTANT** On last repeat only, work Row 27 as follows to eliminate eyelets:

[Seed 3], knit to marker, SM, k8, yo, SK2P, yo, k9, [seed 5].

 

Chart B

14carat chartB

14carat legend

 

 

 

Posted in 14 Carat | 66 Responses