Behind The Scenes – Part 3

Part Two had us jumping into the deep end with four different cables.  In Part Three we are entering deeper waters with a total of six cables!

Section C forms the center of the piece and is adorned with a standard cable through the middle diamond.  A right leaning and left leaning cable in Row 1 set the stage for the column of ordinary cables.  Because this cable is vertical and does not travel across the fabric, it remains in all knit on the right side and all purl on the wrong side.  With all of the fancy cables it is nice to return to the simplicity of a standard cable.  I love how this classic cable adds another dimension to the design.  Check it out for yourself in the photo below.

I have listed the yarn weights remaining after each of the six repeats in Section C.  Each repeat used approximately 12-13 grams of yarn.  If you are using more yarn than listed, a pattern repeat may be eliminated to conserve yarn and ensure that you have enough yarn to complete the pattern.  At the conclusion of the entire pattern, I had 18 grams remaining in my second skein.

Speaking of second skeins, I joined mine in the 4th repeat of Section C.  I added the skein by using the Russian Join since the chainette construction of Oh! makes it ideal for working this technique.  The Russian Join locks the ends of the yarn together almost invisibly with no ends to weave in.  Watch my Russian Join video for a complete tutorial.

Section D is a mirror image to Section B.  The only difference is that Section D starts midway through the seeded diamond.  For this reason I provide a separate chart and instructions to avoid confusion.  Work Rows 1 – 20 twice, then Rows 1 – 10 again for a total of 50 rows.  A close up photo of Section D is seen below.

As seen in the photo below, Part Three has a lot of knitting for this week.  Part Four is quite short and I thought it best to give you more time to knit the bulk of the pattern before the end of the KAL.  I want you all to finish it up by November 15 so you can enter the prize drawing!

Part Four has inventive buttonholes that are sure to delight you with their unique setting.

Don’t forget to download all of the instructions as they will not be available for free after November 30th.

See you next week!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

BKP (Back, Knit, Purl) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in back, knit 2 from left needle, purl 2 from cable needle.

BKS (Back, Knit, Seed) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in back, knit 2 from left needle, p1, k1 from cable needle.

C4B – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle.

C4F – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle.

cn – cable needle.

FPK (Front, Purl, Knit) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in front, purl 2 from left needle, knit 2 from cable needle.

FSK (Front, Seed, Knit) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in front, p1, k1 from left needle, knit 2 from cable needle.

sl – slip. See Slip Stitch Video

wrap 4 – slip next 4 stitches to cable needle, wrap yarn 3 times counterclockwise around held stitches, k4 from cable needle. See Wrap 3 (4) Video

wyif – with yarn in front.

Click here to download printable version

Section C

Work Rows 1 – 20 six times, ending after Row 20 for a total of 120 rows.  (See Chart C below)

Yarn weight after each repeat as follows:

  • After 1 repeat, 1st skein = 36g
  • After 2 repeats, 1st skein = 24 g
  • After 3 repeats, 1st skein = 11g
  • Joined 2nd skein on Row 17 of 4th   See Russian Join video
  • After 4th repeat, 2nd skein = 98g
  • After 5th repeat, 2nd skein = 86g
  • After 6th repeat, 2nd skein = 73g

If yarn weight is less than listed above, one repeat of Section C may be eliminated to conserve yarn.

 

Row 1. K2, p1, FPK, (p1, k1) 6 times, C4B, C4F, (p1, k1) 6 times, BKP, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 2. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p8, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 3. K2, p3, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, C4B, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, p3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 4. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k2, p4, k2, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 5. K2, p5, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p2, k4, p2, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 6. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k4, p4, k4, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 7. K2, p7, FPK, BKP, p4, C4B, p4, FPK, BKP, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 8. K11, p4, k6, p4, k6, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 9. K2, p9, wrap 4, p6, k4, p6, wrap 4, p9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 10. K11, p4, k6, p4, k6, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 11. K2, p7, BKS, FSK, p4, C4B, p4, BKS, FSK, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 12. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k4, p4, k4, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 13. K2, p5, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p2, k4, p2, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 14. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k2, p4, k2, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 15. K2, p3, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, C4B, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, p3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 16. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p8, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 17. K2, p1, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 18. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1, p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 19. K2, p1, k2, (p1, k1) 8 times, wrap 4, (p1, k1) 8 times, k2, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 20. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1 p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

Chart C

Section D

Work Rows 1 – 20 twice, then work Rows 1 – 10 again ending after Row 10 for a total of 50 rows. (See Chart D below) Upon completion of Section D, weight remaining in 2nd skein = 40g.

Row 1. K2, p1, FPK, (p1, k1) 6 times, BKP, FPK, (p1, k1) 6 times, BKP, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 2. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k4, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 3. K2, p3, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, p4, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, p3, sl 2            wyif.

Row 4. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k8, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 5. K2, p5, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p8, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 6. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k12, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 7. K2, p7, FPK, BKP, p12, FPK, BKP, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 8. K11, p4, k16, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 9. K2, p9, wrap 4, p16, wrap 4, p9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 10. K11, p4, k16, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 11. K2, p7, BKS, FSK, p12, BKS, FSK, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 12. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k12, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 13. K2, p5, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p8, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 14. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k8, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 15. K2, p3, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, p4, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, p3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 16. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k4, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 17. K2, p1, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 18. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1, p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 19. K2, p1, k2, (p1, k1) 8 times, wrap 4, (p1, k1) 8 times, k2, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 20. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1, p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

 

Behind The Scenes – Part 2

I hope you enjoyed “dipping your toes” into the pool of advanced cables in Part One.  Part Two will have you diving into the deep end of the pool to discover more advanced cables to enhance our piece.  These intricate cables create a handsome seed stitch diamond pattern set on a background of purl.

Section B begins with a lovely wrapped stitch to anchor the base of the diamonds.  The Wrap 4 is found at the base of each diamond and also in the center where the diamonds adjoin.  This interesting technique gathers several stitches using a cable needle to add charming texture to the fabric.  To execute a Wrap 4,  start by slipping the next four stitches to a cable needle.  Wrap the working yarn yarn counterclockwise around the held stitches ending on the wrong side of the work.  Lastly, knit each of the stitches onto the right hand needle.  I demonstrate the wrapped stitch in my Wrap 3 (4) video.  Please note that the Wrap 3 is demonstrated in the video.  A Wrap 4 is exactly the same, except 4 stitches are slipped to the cable needle instead of 3.

The Wrap Stitch is not only great to use with cables, but it is often found in lace designs.  I used the Wrap Stitch in one section of my Building With Lace book.  The stitch is found in the center of the diamonds seen above.

The diamond shapes in this section of Behind The Scenes are filled with seed stitch, as seen above.  The added texture adds dimension and interest to the center of the diamonds.  To form the seed stitch in the center of the diamond, the traveling cables will now include seed stitch.  Two of the stitches will remain in knit as the framework of the diamond.  The other two stitches will be worked as (p1, k1) to fill the center with a seed pattern.

Rows 3 – 9 contain the seed cables.  Close inspection of the chart illustrates how the stitches work together.  In seed stitch, the knit and purl stitches are arranged in a staggered fashion.  Notice how the stitches in these cables place a purl and knit stitch carefully within the center to maintain the design.

I have chosen abbreviations for these cables that I think will help you to execute them successfully with minimum confusion.

The traveling right leaning seed cable is worked by slipping two stitches to a cable needle and holding them in back.  Next, knit two stitches from the left needle.  Lastly, work the two held stitches from the cable needle as p1, k1.  I abbreviate this cable as BKS.  This is my shorthand for hold stitches to the Back, Knit the next two stitches, Seed the stitches off cable needle.

The traveling left leaning seed cable is worked by slipping two stitches to a cable needle and holding them in front.  Next, work the two stitches from the left needle as p1, k1.  Lastly, knit the two held stitches from the cable needle.  I abbreviate this cable as FSK.  This is my shorthand for hold stitches to the Front, Seed the next two stitches, Knit stitches off cable needle.

Both of the above cables are executed like a standard cable stitch except that one group of the stitches is worked in seed (p1, k1) on the right side.

The cables in Rows 13 – 19 are the BKP and FPK used in Part 1.  The stitches behind the forefront knit stitches are forming the purl background as the cables travel inward.

I have again provided both charted and written instructions for this section.  The cables are color coded in the chart for easy reading.  With four separate cables in the chart, color coding is more helpful than ever!

If working from the written instructions, I recommend color coding the cable abbreviations within each row for easy reading.  The written instructions rely heavily on parentheses.  Remember, any stitches within ( ) are worked the number of times stated by the number following the ( ).

For Section B, work Rows 1 – 20 two times, then work Rows 1 – 12 again for a total of 52 rows.  At the conclusion of Section B, I had 51g remaining in my first skein.  Should your yardage differ dramatically from mine, adjustments will be made in next week’s section.

Speaking of next week, Part 3 is the longest section in the pattern.  Finish up all your other work this week because you will need to have lots of knitting time for the next clue!

Don’t forget to download all of the instructions as they will not be available for free after November 30.

Happy knitting,

Michelle

 

 

BKP (Back, Knit, Purl) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in back, knit 2 from left needle, purl 2 from cable needle.

BKS (Back, Knit, Seed) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in back, knit 2 from left needle, p1, k1 from cable needle.

cn – cable needle.

FPK (Front, Purl, Knit) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in front, purl 2 from left needle, knit 2 from cable needle.

FSK (Front, Seed, Knit) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in front, p1, k1 from left needle, knit 2 from cable needle.

sl – slip. See Slip Stitch Video

wrap 4 – slip next 4 stitches to cable needle, wrap yarn 3 times counterclockwise around held stitches, k4 from cable needle. See Wrap 3 (4) Video

wyif – with yarn in front.

Click here to download printable version

Section B

Work Rows 1 – 20 twice, then work Rows 1 – 12 again ending after Row 12 for a total of 52 rows. (See Chart B) Upon completion of Section B, weight remaining in 1st skein = 51g.

Row 1. K2, p9, wrap 4, p16, wrap 4, p9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 2. K11, p4, k16, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Row 3. K2, p7, BKS, FSK, p12, BKS, FSK, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 4. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k12, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 5. K2, p5, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p8, BKS, (p1, k1) twice, FSK, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 6. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k8, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 7. K2, p3, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, p4, BKS, (p1, k1) 4 times, FSK, p3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 8. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k4, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 9. K2, p1, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, BKS, (p1, k1) 6 times, FSK, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 10. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1, p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 11. K2, p1, k2, (p1, k1) 8 times, wrap 4, (p1, k1) 8 times, k2, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 12. K3, p2, (k1, p1) 8 times, p4, (k1, p1) 8 times, p2, k1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 13. K2, p1, FPK, (p1, k1) 6 times, BKP, FPK, (p1, k1) 6 times, BKP, p1, sl 2 wyif.

Row 14. K5, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k4, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, p2, k3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 15. K2, p3, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, p4, FPK, (p1, k1) 4 times, BKP, p3, sl 2 wyif.

Row 16. K7, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k8, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, p2, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 17. K2, p5, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p8, FPK, (p1, k1) twice, BKP, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 18. K9, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k12, p2, (k1, p1) twice, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 19. K2, p7, FPK, BKP, p12, FPK, BKP, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 20. K11, p4, k16, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

Behind The Scenes – Part 1

Welcome to the Progressive Needles Knit Along sponsored by Skacel Collection!  As always, the KAL brings a new pattern solely focused on increasing your knitting skills.  Behind The Scenes is a cabled scarf which is buttoned up to be worn as a cowl.  Whether you are a novice or experienced cable knitter, this design provides plenty of learning opportunities.

Before we begin, here is an overview of the KAL:

  • A portion of the 4-part mystery pattern is revealed here on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Thursdays in October at 9am Eastern time.  The weekly pattern, video resources and lots of helpful tips are included in each post.  An abbreviated, pattern-only version is included to download.
  • All techniques are supported with video instruction at knitpurlhunter.com
  • All questions and comments are monitored daily both here and in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.  It’s like having  your own private knitting tutor!
  • Projects completed by November 15 are eligible for the monthly prize drawing – first prize is a set of addi Clicks!  See skacelknitting.com for all the info.
  • VERY IMPORTANT:  Behind The Scenes is a FREE pattern through November 30.  After this date, it will only be available for purchase on Ravelry.  Be sure to download each portion of the pattern prior to this date.  The helpful tips and videos for each section will remain on my website indefinitely.

What’s In A Name?

The reason for naming this pattern Behind The Scenes is two-fold.  First, I will be giving you a glimpse into the design process and the decisions driving the stitch and technique choices.  This backstage look will not only help you knit this pattern successfully, it will give you the confidence to try your own hand at designing and modifying patterns.  Secondly, all cables are formed when a group of stitches are “behind” another group of stitches.  Our pattern will contain explanations to help you understand the role of these background stitches.

The pattern has the added bonus of being knit with the delightful softness of HiKoo Oh! yarn.  When the yarn was in its development, all who touched it exclaimed “Oh!” and its name was born.  One touch and you will agree with the choice!  This yarn is manufactured on one of the very few machines worldwide that can create a chainette construction directly from roving. Since the yarn is never spun, it allows for the fiber to be as soft as possible, while maintaining durability and strength.  You’ll love wearing it around your neck!

Yardage

One of the biggest challenges for a designer is determining how much yarn to recommend for the pattern.  If the design uses too much yarn, then there is a risk of knitters running short of yarn and that is a HUGE problem.  On the flip side, having too much yarn left over leaves many knitters unhappy about purchasing the last skein.  All of us would love to knit up every inch of yarn in the project, but it is nearly impossible to design a pattern for that.   In Behind The Scenes, the pattern leaves 18 g/34 yards leftover when knit to gauge.  Even the most careful swatching can result in a variation of yarn usage.  For this reason, I include the yarn weight at the conclusion of each section.  Weigh your skein throughout the pattern to evaluate your usage compared to mine.  Should your yardage differ, there will an opportunity to adjust the length of the piece in Part 3 of the KAL.

Getting Started

Part One begins with a flat lying edge leading into horseshoe shaped cables that will house each button.  Garter stitch is perfect for this edge to prevent curling with just a minimum of rows.  Cast on for this edge using the Long Tail Cast On.  This cast on places knit stitches on the needle.  At the completion of the cast on in flat knitting, the work is turned leaving purl stitches facing front.  The purl stitches blend nicely into the garter edge and helps promote stability.

Immediately following the cast on, the sides of the piece are worked in an I-cord edging.  Other common flat-lying edges (garter, seed) would have worked, but the I-cord has the same “bulk” as the interior cables for a harmonious pairing.  An I-cord edge is quite easy to work.  Simply slip the last two stitches of every row with yarn in front.  (Remember the general knitting rule:  stitches are ALWAYS slipped as if to purl unless otherwise stated.)

Cable School

Cables are made by slipping a number of stitches from the left needle to a cable needle.  The cable needle stitches are then held to either the front or the back of the work while working a number of stitches off of the left hand needle.  Lastly, the stitches held on the cable needle are worked to complete the cable.  Stitches held to the back of the work will create a cable that leans (crosses) to the right.  Stitches held to the front of the work will result in a cable that leans (crosses) to the left.

The photo above shows a square from my Building Blocks book that illustrates simple cables.  The cables on the right hand side of the block lean right and the cable on the left hand side lean to the left.  The center cable is known as a Staghorn Cable which is formed when a left and right leaning meet.  In this example, the cables are formed from a column of stitches that are worked in all knit on the right side and all purl on the wrong side.  My Cables video demonstrates how to execute a left and right leaning cable.

In Behind The Scenes, the design features cables that travel across the fabric.  To achieve this bit of knitting magic, the cables are worked in both knit and purl on the right and wrong sides.  The stitches in the front of the cable will remain in knit and the stitches behind them will be worked in purl.

In Part One, the traveling left leaning cable is worked by slipping two stitches to a cable needle and holding them in front.  Next, purl two stitches from the left needle.  Lastly, knit the two held stitches from the cable needle.  I abbreviate this cable as FPK.  This is my shorthand for hold stitches to the Front, Purl the next two stitches, Knit stitches off cable needle.

The traveling right leaning cable is worked by slipping two stitches to a cable needle and holding them in back.  Next, knit two stitches from the left needle.  Lastly, purl the two held stitches from the cable needle.  I abbreviate this cable as BKP.  This is my shorthand for hold stitches to the Back, Knit the next two stitches, Purl stitches off cable needle.

Both of the above cables are executed like a standard cable stitch except that one group of the stitches is worked in purl on the right side.  This deviation will surely keep you on your toes!

I have provided both charted and written instructions for this pattern.  The cables are color coded in the chart for easy reading.

Even if you do not work from the chart, I encourage you to use it to compare the design with the stitches on your needle.  When working from the written instructions, consider color coding the cable abbreviations within the pertinent rows to match the charted instructions. (Highlighters work perfectly!)  This makes it easier on the eyes and avoids executing the incorrect cable.  If you find a mis-crossed cable several rows back, watch my Fixing a Mis-Crossed Cable video for a repair tutorial.

If you are an experienced cable knitter and are looking for a challenge.  Try executing these cables without a cable needle.  Since the needles and yarn are larger, it is a good project to give this technique a try.  See Cables Without A Cable Needle video.

The photo below shows Part One completed.  The piece has not been blocked so the button areas inside the four “horseshoes” are slightly small for my larger 1″ buttons.  Blocking will widen this area and it will also correct the edges from drawing in.

Next week brings us more new cables to add to the mix!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

  • OH! By HiKoo, 100% baby alpaca, 100g / 191 yds, 2 skeins
  • US#10(6mm) needle, straight or 24” circular
  • 4 round buttons, 5/8 – 1” in size
  • Cable needle

18 stitches = 4” in stockinette, unblocked

Prior to blocking – 45”long, 7” wide.  After blocking – 47”long, 8 ½” wide.

BKP (Back, Knit, Purl) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in back, knit 2 from left needle, purl 2 from cable needle.

cn – cable needle.

FPK (Front, Purl, Knit) – slip 2 stitches to cable needle and hold in front, purl 2 from left needle, knit 2 from cable needle.

sl – slip. See Slip Stitch Video

wyif – with yarn in front.

Click here to download printable version

Part One

Cast on 46 stitches using Long Tail Cast On. See Long Tail Cast On Video

Set Up

Row 1. Knit to last 2 sts, sl 2 wyif.

Rows 2 – 4. Same as Row 1.

Section A

Work Rows 1 – 22 once. (See Chart A) Upon completion of Section A, weight remaining in 1st skein = 83g.

Row 1. (RS) K2, *p2, k2, p4, k2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, p2, sl 2 wyif.

Row 2. (WS) K2, *k2, p2, k4, p2; repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, sl 2 wyif.

Row 3. Same as Row 1.

Row 4. Same as Row 2.

Row 5. Same as Row 1.

Row 6. Same as Row 2.

Row 7. Same as Row 1.

Row 8. Same as Row 2.

Row 9. Same as Row 1.

Row 10. Same as Row 2.

Row 11. K2, p2, *FPK, BKP, p2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, sl 2 wyif.

Row 12. K7, p2, *k8, p2; repeat from * to last 7 sts, k5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 13. K2, p5, k2 *p8, k2; repeat from * to last 7 st, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 14. Same as Row 12.

Row 15. Same as Row 13.

Row 16. Same as Row 12.

Row 17. Same as Row 13.

Row 18. Same as Row 12.

Row 19. K2, p5, FPK, p4, BKP, p8, FPK, p4, BKP, p5, sl 2 wyif.

Row 20. K9, p2, k4, p2, k12, p2, k4, p2, k7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 21. K2, p7, FPK, BKP, p12, FPK, BKP, p7, sl 2 wyif.

Row 22. K11, p4, k16, p4, k9, sl 2 wyif.

October 2017 KAL – Behind The Scenes

My next knit along, Behind The Scenes, begins October 5th with a new yarn and more new skills.  This unique mystery pattern is a gorgeous cabled design sure to increase your cable skills and knowledge.  Behind The Scenes is knit as a long rectangle that may be worn as a scarf or stylishly buttoned into a cozy cowl.

The cowl is knit in HiKoo’s brand new yarn Oh!  Available in eight colors, this chunky yarn is made of 100% Super Baby Alpaca for unprecedented softness.  One touch and you will know exactly how the yarn got its name because everyone who holds this amazing yarn immediately sighs, “Oh!”.

Once again, button selection was tons of fun for me.  Since they are a prominent feature in the pattern, I wanted a button that was a complement to the bold cable work.  I chose the 1″ horn buttons seen nestled in the yarn above.  For those interested, the buttons are by Skacel buttons #BM0718H30.

All of my KALs are a 4-part mystery pattern with one section revealed each week on my website.    The knit along is FREE with no registration required.  Simply go to my website on October 5th after 9am Eastern time to view the first clue.  What’s not a mystery, is that all of the skills are supported with my online video instruction.  I answer questions daily on my website and Ravelry to guarantee success.

Materials

  • OH! By HiKoo, 100% baby alpaca, 100g / 191 yds, 2 skeins
  • US #10(6mm) needle, straight or 24” circular, or size needed to achieve stated gauge. I used olive wood circular needles
  • 4 round buttons, 5/8 – 1” in size, I used #BM0718H30 (approx. 1″)
  • Cable needle

Gauge   
18 stitches = 4″ in stockinette, unblocked

Size
47″ long, 8 1/2″ wide

I had the great joy of knitting Behind The Scenes with my first pair of olive wood needles.  The richly smooth wood made a gentle sound with a restful feel in my hands.

Created from the wood of non-fruit bearing olive trees, each addi® Olive Wood needle is finished with a plant-based oil to protect its unique look. The needles are quiet and comfortable to work with, as all tips and grips attain body temperature quickly – making them a great choice for arthritic hands.

Adorable Ewe – Part 4

Adorable Ewe is available to purchase on Ravelry.

The helpful tips for each section of the sweater featured in the April 2017 KAL are found below. 

We are finally ready to assemble the sweater to welcome a special new baby.  I can hear you grumbling about the seaming process.  Seams are necessary to add structure and flattering lines to a piece.  Imagine if all of the clothes in your closet were seamless – every garment would be a giant tube over your body with no shape or drape.  Taking the time to learn this most essential of all knitting skills will produce garments that flatter and fit.

Shoulder Seams

The finishing begins with the shoulder seams.  Shoulders require a sturdy seam since they must withstand the weight of the garment as it hangs on the body.  A flimsy seam will pull apart and cause the sweater to sag.  In Adorable Ewe, we are joining the front to the back with a three-needle bind off.  This technique creates a firm seam as the stitches are bound off – so slick and simple!  See Three-Needle Bind Off video

The bind off gets its name from the three needles required to work the seam.  We can substitute our two project needles to do the work of three needles for the bind off.  Using the smaller size circular needle,  place the resting 13 Front stitches on one needle and the corresponding 13 Back stitches on the needle at the other end of the circ.  For the third needle, use the larger size needle (circ knitters will use only one end, straights use just one needle).  The photo below shows the work ready to begin the bind off.  (White yarn is my waste yarn holding the center Back stitches.)

As seen above, the three-needle bind off is worked with right sides together.  The needles holding the stitches are parallel and pointing to the right.  The tail remaining from one of the pieces serves as the working yarn for the bind off.  Insert the third needle into the first stitch on each needle and knit the two stitches together.  One stitch is now on the right hand needle. Again, insert the third needle into the first stitch on each needle and knit the two stitches together.  There are now two stitches on the right hand needle.  With one of the left needles, lift the first stitch over the second stitch and off the right hand needle.  Repeat until one stitch remains.  Cut the yarn and draw it through the last stitch.  I prefer to bury the shoulder tails into this seam.

Repeat the same process for the second shoulder, leaving the center 14 Back stitches on a holder.  The photo below shows both shoulders seamed with the center Back stitches resting on waste yarn.

Sleeves

The next step is to set in the sleeves.  Fold the sleeve in half along the bind off edge to locate the center of this edge.  Pin the center of the sleeve to the shoulder seam as seen at the green marker in the photo below.  Pin each end to the outer edges of the piece.  It is a good idea to measure that each end is equidistant from the center.

The sleeve is attached using a modified version of the invisible horizontal seam working from right to left.  With no tail at our disposal, a working yarn must be attached for seaming.  I like to thread a few inches of yarn along the bind off edge of the sleeve working toward the right edge to anchor the yarn.  Using this new yarn, attach the sleeve as seen in my Vertical to Horizontal Seam video.  It explains the process much clearer than I can state in words.  Once complete, the seam is a marvel – see for yourself below.  Repeat for the second sleeve.

Side and Arm Seams

The sides and arms are seamed using the Mattress Stitch. This is the most commonly used seam in finishing because it is nearly invisible and quite easy to work.  See Mattress Stitch  video

The side seam and arm seam may be worked as one continuous seam beginning at either edge.  Place the pieces on a flat surface with right sides facing up.  Pin the edges together matching the ribbing and armhole. Using the tail at either the sleeve or body edge, thread the yarn through a blunt tip tapestry needle.  With the attached long tail, enter under the first cast on stitch on the opposite side of the attached tail to secure the edges together.

The Mattress Stitch is worked one full stitch in from the edge allowing the “wonky” edge stitch to be hidden in the seam. Stretch the work to reveal the horizontal bars that lie between the first and second stitch in each row. These are the bars that will be picked or “scooped” up to sew the seam.

After securing the yarn as described above, work the Mattress Stitch from bottom to top as follows:

  1. Taking the needle to the opposite piece, insert the needle under the single bar found between the first and second stitch of the first row and draw the yarn through to the right side. A single bar is picked up in this step only.
  1. Return the needle to the other side and pick up the first two horizontal bars lying between the first and second column of stitches drawing yarn to the front.
  1. Insert the needle into the same space where it emerged from on the opposite piece and pick up two bars.

Continue working back and forth, picking up two bars on each side. Pause every inch or so to adjust the yarn tension to maintain a smooth seam.

Here is a look at my side seam:

Horizontal Bands – Front Edging

The final step in the finishing process is the addition of horizontal ribbed bands along the fronts and neck of the sweater.  This band is where the buttonholes and buttons are placed.  To knit the band, stitches are picked up and knit at the Right Front and then the Right Neck. Next, knit the held center Back stitches.  Lastly, pick up and knit stitches along the Left Neck and then the Left Front.  If you are new to picking up stitches, I recommend watching my Pick Up and Knit Video.

When picking up and knitting, work from right to left with Right Side facing.  With US #8 32″ needle and Main Color (MC), insert needle tip from front to back between the edge stitch and the second stitch at the lower edge of the Right Front.  (See photo below)

Wrap the yarn around the needle tip as if to knit and draw through a loop to the Right Side – one stitch has been picked up and knit.  Continue working in this manner picking up 28 stitches up to the neck shaping on the Right Front.  Four stitches have been picked up and knit in the photo below.

At the Right Neck, pick up and knit 16 stitches between the edge stitch and decreases stitches.  I illustrate this with contrasting yarn in the photo below.

Knit the held stitches onto the long circular needle and then pick up 16 stitches down the Left Neck and 28 stitches down the Left Front.  102 stitches are on the needle.

With Wrong Side facing, begin the ribbing with Row 1.  Row 2 (RS) is the buttonhole row where a yarn over paired with a decrease makes our simple buttonhole.  Work Rows 3 and 4 in the established rib and bind off in pattern.  See Bind Off in Pattern video

Below is a simple chart illustrating the buttonhole placement over the 28 stitches along the Right Front.  This buttonhole placement is typically considered to be unisex.  However, if you would like to place the buttonholes on the Left Front, rib to the last 28 stitches in Row 2 work this chart over the Left Front.

Row Gauge Considerations

The number of stitches picked up along the bands is based on the stated row gauge. If your row gauge is close to the stated number then you should be able to work the required number of stitches.  Fudging a stitch here or there will be fine.  If your row gauge is dramatically different, then you may need to adjust the number of stitches you pick up.  The standard procedure when picking up stitches along a horizontal edge is to pick up three stitches for every four rows.  In addition to this ratio, the number of stitches picked up and knit must be a multiple of 4 + 2 for the rib.

If you absolutely can not pick up the required number of stitches, pick up along the edge using the 3:4 ratio and rounding to a multiple of 4 + 2.  Work Row 1 as written.  Place pins on the Left Front to mark the location of the buttons.  In Row 2, work a yarn over/decrease pair on the Right Front opposite of the button placement.  I like to work a p2tog when the first stitch in the decrease is a purl and a k2tog when the first stitch in the decrease is a knit.  (You don’t have to be this persnickety!)  It is very common to make adjustments like these in the finishing process.

Buttons

Sew buttons onto fronts opposite of the buttonholes.  I prefer to use matching thread to secure the buttons firmly.

Adorable Ewe

I hope you enjoyed knitting the sweater along with me.  The pattern will remain a free download until the close of the KAL on May 15th.  Entries for the prize drawing are accepted until midnight on May 15th for a chance to win a set of addi Clicks.  Be sure to enter the drawing – each entry tell Skacel to continue this free education.

I will continue to monitor questions about Adorable Ewe indefinitely.  After May 15th the pattern will available for purchase on Ravelry.

October KAL

I will return with the Progressive Needles Knit Along in October with a fabulous surprise.  The project features a brand new and deliciously soft yarn.  It’s too early to pass along the details as the yarn hasn’t reached the store shelves.  Subscribe to my newsletter to receive all of the breaking news as it arrives.  All I can say about the yarn is WOW!

My Special New Baby

Before I close let me introduce you to the newest Adorable Ewe model, my first grandchild, Georgia.  This little nugget was born April 16th and has a bit of growing until she fits into her sweater properly.  My heart is full of love!

Until next time, happy knitting!

Michelle