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Cableship – Part 3

Are you a huge fan of the German Short Row Heel, too?  I’m still marveling at its simple construction!

It’s now time to move up the leg with another cable design.  The instep design will continue up the front of the leg while the former heel/foot stitches will get their very own cable pattern.  I fiddled around with graph paper and practice yarn to arrive at the new cable design.  I love how it graces the back of the leg so regally.  The cables move over the ribbed design.  I think you will enjoy the unique cables found in Rows 17 and 31.  These cables include one knit and one purl stitch to form a central arch.  They are fun to work!

cableship-leg

Begin the leg by working Row 1 of the Instep pattern (found in Part 1) over the front of the leg and then working Row 1 of the Leg Back pattern over the former heel stitches.  Both charts or written instructions must be followed at the same time.  All goes well in Rows 1- 8 when the numbers are the same for both the front and back.  After Row 8, return to Row 1 (Instep Design) over the front leg and then work Row 9 (Leg Back Design) for the back of the leg.  To avoid confusion, I made a few cheat notes in my chart margins to help me stay on track.  It is easy to get lost moving from chart to chart so I found that this system worked well for me.

Margin notes for the corresponding Leg Back design are seen next to the Instep design row here:

cablship-chart2

Margin notes for the corresponding Leg Front (former Instep) design is seen next to the Leg Back design row:

cableship-chart3

As you can see, the Leg Back charts are rather large and fill an entire page for each size.  If you do not wish to print out all of the charts, preview the document and only print the necessary pages.

Work the Leg Back design until the leg reaches 1 1/2″ less than the total desired height of the leg ending after Row 32 of Leg Back design.  I worked two full repeats of the Leg Back design for my sock and these two repeats came to measure about 5″.  Next week’s instructions will add about 1 1/2″.

See you next week when I bring you a great new bind off perfect for toe up socks.

Happy knitting,

Michelle

Part Three

Click here to download printable version

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

C4B (C2 over 2 Right) – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle. See Cables Video

C4F (C2 over 2 Left) – slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit next 2 stitches from left hand needle, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle. See Cables Video

LTp (Left Twist, purl bg) – slip next stitch to cable needle and hold in front of work, p1 from left hand needle, k1 from cable needle.

RTp (Right Twist, purl bg) – slip next stitch to cable needle and hold in back of work, k1 from left hand needle, p1 from cable needle.

KPHtemplate_instructions

Directions are for Small (Medium, Large in parentheses when necessary).

Leg

Prior to knitting the leg, count the stitches for accuracy.

Continue established instep design for Leg Front over first 28(32, 36) stitches beginning with Row 1. (Instructions found in Part One.)

Work Leg Back design over second 28(32, 36) stitches in appropriate size from written instructions following or from charts found below, until leg reaches 1 ½” less than desired length ending after Row 32 of Leg Back design. On Leg Front, Row 8 will be last row worked.

Leg Back – Small

  1. P1, k4, p2, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, p2, k4, p1.

2 – 8. Same as 1.

  1. P1, k2, C4F, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, C4B, k2, p1.
  2. P1, k10, p2, k2, p2, k10, p1.
  3. P1, k4, C4F, (k2, p2) twice, k2, C4B, k4, p1.
  4. Same as 1.
  5. P1, k4, p2, C4F, p2, k2, p2, C4B, p2, k4, p1.
  6. Same as 1.
  7. P1, k4, p2, k2, C4F, k2, C4B, k2, p2, k4, p1.
  8. P1, k4, p2, k14, p2, k4, p1.
  9. P1, k4, p2, k4, p1, LTp, RTp, p1, k4, p2, k4, p1.

18 – 26. Same as 1.

  1. Same as 13.
  2. Same as 1.
  3. Same as 15.
  4. Same as 16.
  5. Same as 17.
  6. Same as 1.

Leg Back – Medium

  1. K1, p2, k4, p2, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, p2, k4, p2, k1.

2 – 8. Same as 1.

  1. K1, p2 ,k2, C4F, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, C4B, k2, p2, k1.
  2. K1, p2, k10, p2, k2, p2, k10, p2, k1.
  3. K1, p2, k4, C4F, (k2, p2) twice, k2, C4B, k4, p2, k1.
  4. Same as 1.
  5. K1, p2, k4, p2, C4F, p2, k2, p2, C4B, p2, k4, p2, k1.
  6. Same as 1.
  7. K1, p2, k4, p2, k2, C4F, k2, C4B, k2, p2, k4, p2, k1.
  8. K1, p2, k4, p2, k14, p2, k4, p2, k1.
  9. K1, p2, k4, p2, k4, p1, LTp, RTp, p1, k4, p2, k4, p2, k1.

18 – 26. Same as 1.

  1. Same as 13.
  2. Same as 1.
  3. Same as 15.
  4. Same as 16.
  5. Same as 17.
  6. Same as 1.

Leg Back – Large

  1. P1, k2, p2, k4, p2, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, p2, k4, p2, k2, p1.

2 – 8. Same as 1.

  1. P1, k2, p2 ,k2, C4F, k4, p2, k2, p2, k4, C4B, k2, p2, k2, p1.
  2. P1, k2, p2, k10, p2, k2, p2, k10, p2, k2, p1.
  3. P1, k2, p2, k4, C4F, (k2, p2) twice, k2, C4B, k4, p2, k2, p1.
  4. Same as 1.
  5. P1, k2, p2, k4, p2, C4F, p2, k2, p2, C4B, p2, k4, p2, k2, p1.
  6. Same as 1.
  7. P1, k2, p2, k4, p2, k2, C4F, k2, C4B, k2, p2, k4, p2, k2, p1.
  8. P1, k2, p2, k4, p2, k14, p2, k4, p2, k2, p1.
  9. P1, k2, p2, k4, p2, k4, p1, LTp, RTp, p1, k4, p2, k4, p2, k2, p1.

18 – 26. Same as 1.

  1. Same as 13.
  2. Same as 1.
  3. Same as 15.
  4. Same as 16.
  5. Same as 17.
  6. Same as 1.

cableshipbacklegend

Leg Back – Small

cableshipsmback

Leg Back – Medium

cableshipbackmed

Leg Back – Large

cableshipbacklg

 

Also posted in Cableship | Tagged | 9 Responses

Cableship – October KAL!

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Cables and I have long had a deep, loving relationship that I refer to as a “cableship”.  I bring the yarn and needles, while the cables bring the power to make my heart sing!

Join me October 6th for my next mystery knit along, Cableship.  This toe up sock pattern is full of great cable techniques, but also includes a heel new to the series.  Yes, I have uncovered another method for simple sock success!

I designed Cableship to showcase the vibrant hues of Zauberball sock yarn.  The sock knits up beautifully in every shade of this rich, gradient yarn.  My video tutorials and daily interaction make the sock knitting a snap.  The only hard part will be choosing just one color of Zauberball!

The KAL is FREE and no registration is required.  Simply go to knitpurlhunter.com anytime after 9 am on October 6th to download the first installment of the pattern.  I answer questions daily on my website and in my Ravelry group.

Prizes are generously provided by our sponsor, Skacel Collection.

Materials

  • Zauberball Socks, 75%wool/25%nylon, 100g/459 yards, 1 skein
  • US #2 (2.75mm) or size necessary to achieve desired gauge.  Pattern may be knit with double points, two circulars or Magic Loop method.
  • Cable needle
  • Markers

Gauge

Approx. 8 sts = 1″ in stockinette

Size

Small, Medium and Large.
Small – leg circumference measures approximately 5” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 10”.
Medium – leg circumference measures approximately 6” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 12”.
Large – leg circumference measures approximately 7” unstretched and stretches comfortably to 14”.

Further size adjustment may be made by changing needle sizes.

Also posted in Cableship | 111 Responses

Scoreboard 2.0

scoreboard2

 

Click here to download printable version

Questions are also monitored daily through the end of the season in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.

KPHtemplate_materials

Featured Yarn

HiKoo Simplicity, 55% Merino superwash, 28% acrylic, 17% nylon; 117 yds / 50g; uses two team colors, approx. 3 (6) skeins each.

Optional – one skein of a third color for a visual break between games.

addi Needles

Two 4.5mm (approx. US 7) 16” circular needles

(Second needle is needed to graft stitches using Kitchener Stitch)

Additional Notions

Tapestry needle, stitch marker, approx. 1 yd of waste yarn, Size G crochet hook – for provisional cast on

KPHtemplate_gauge

21 stitches and 27 rounds = 4” in Stockinette Stitch

KPHtemplate_size

Small (Large)

Average cowl is 8” wide, approx. 40 (94)” around.

Length around varies with total number of points scored.

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

MC – Main Color. Primary color that represents your favorite team.

CC – Contrasting Color. Secondary color that will always represent the opponent.

CC2 – Contrasting Color 2. Optional third color used to separate games.

Notes

  • Cowl is worked in the two colors of your favorite team.
  • Primary color represents your team (MC).
  • Secondary color will always represent the opponent (CC).
  • All stitches are worked in knit.
  • When changing colors, work the Jogless Stripe technique for smooth color transitions.  See Jogless Stripe video
  • When working stripes that are 4 or more rounds high, carry the unused yarn with the working yarn by twisting the yarns together on the wrong side at the beginning of every 4th round as in photo below.  See Carrying Yarns in Circular Knitting video

scoreboardcarry

 

KPHtemplate_instructions

All Sizes

With waste yarn, cast on 80 stitches using a Provisional Cast On.  See Provisional Cast On video

Place marker and join in the round, taking care not to twist the stitches.

Upon completion of first round (as described below), place a Lifeline through the stitches to aid in removal of provisional cast on at end of project. See Lifeline video

Short Version (shown above)

The striping sequence is determined by the order of the scores in each game. Knit two rounds in designated color each time a team scores. A score can be a field goal, touchdown (includes extra point), or safety.

Example game summary:

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds MC

Favorite team scores a field goal – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a field goal – knit 2 rounds CC

Total = 10 rounds knit for game.

Work as above for each game of the season.

 

Long Version (shown below)

The striping sequence is determined by the order and amount of the points scored in each game. Knit one round in designated color every time a team scores a point.

Example game summary:

Favorite team scores a touchdown – knit 6 rounds MC

Favorite team’s extra point is good – knit 1 round MC

Opponent scores a field goal – knit 3 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a touch down – knit 6 rounds MC

Favorite scores a 2-point conversion – knit 2 rounds MC

Opponent scores a touchdown and extra point – knit 7 rounds CC

Favorite team scores a field goal – knit 3 rounds MC

Total = 28 rounds knit for game.

Work rounds based on the points for each game of the season.

 

Both Sizes

If desired, a visual separation between the games of the season can be worked using the optional third color:

  • Option 1 Game Separation: At conclusion of game, and using CC2, knit one round, purl one round, knit one round to denote end of game with a textured break.
  • Option 2 Game Separation: At conclusion of game, and using CC2, knit one round to denote end of game with a small stripe of color 3.

static1.squarespace

Finishing

Weave in all ends prior to closing tube.

Break yarn leaving 60” tail.

Using the Lifeline as a guide, thread the second circular needle through Round 1 and remove the waste yarn used for the provisional cast on.

Thread tail onto tapestry needle and close tube by grafting stitches with Kitchener Stitch.  See Kitchener Stitch in the Round video

If desired, weave in the tail onto the Right Side using Duplicate Stitch.  See Duplicate Stitch video

©2016 Michelle Hunter

scoreboardKPH

For an overview of the project, watch my Scoreboard KAL video.

Also posted in Scoreboard | 44 Responses

14 Carat – Part 1

 

14caratsketch

Welcome to the spring installment of the Progressive Needles Knit Along.  I’m thrilled to share 14 Carat with you – a poncho that is as much fun to knit as it is to wear.  I was shopping last week and saw ponchos in every store and on so many women.  The best news is that they looked great on everyone!  Our poncho is enhanced by the excellent drape and beautiful hues of Cobasi.  A big thank you to our sponsor, Skacel Collection, for distributing this yarn and for their continued support of knitting education.

Before we begin, here is an overview of the KAL:

  • A portion of the 4-part mystery pattern is revealed here on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Thursdays in April at 9am Eastern time.  The weekly pattern, video resources and lots of helpful tips are included in each post.  An abbreviated, pattern-only version is included to download.
  • All techniques are supported with video instruction at knitpurlhunter.com
  • All questions and comments are monitored daily both here and in the Knit Purl Hunter group on Ravelry.  It’s like having  your own private knitting tutor!
  • Projects completed by May 31 are eligible for the monthly prize drawing – first prize is a set of addi Clicks!  See skacelknitting.com for all the info.

14 Carat has a very simple construction that is easy to customize.  The poncho is knit as one long rectangle that is folded in half widthwise and then seamed partially along one long side.  The width of the rectangle becomes the shorter length from shoulder to wrist as seen on the left side of the above sketch.  The open portion of the seam becomes the neck opening. The closed portion of the seam drapes asymmetrically lower as seen on the right side of the sketch.  Since it is the length of the rectangle that wraps horizontally around the body, it is very easy to adjust this measurement to suit the width of YOU.  We will address how to customize the size in next week’s clue.

This week you must decide the width of the rectangle (22 or 24 1/2)” which will drape from neck to arm.  Some of this measurement sits on the shoulder and also drapes at the neckline.

I have heard from many knitters fretting over which size to knit.  Ignore the size names – I had to give them some kind of a moniker.  Instead, choose the width of the rectangle (to be the length of the shorter side) and the length of the rectangle will be adjusted as needed.  As I stated in earlier posts, the smaller size is more like the dreaded “One Size Fits All”.  The larger size fits those who need a bit more.  The body width of both sizes can be customized in Part 2.  Don’t worry – the fit will be fabulous!

Because the cast on and bind off edges will eventually be seen side by side, it is important that they have a similar appearance.  For this reason, I chose to cast on using the Crochet Cast On method.  The result is a smooth and somewhat loose cast on that closely resembles the Standard Bind Off.  With no long tail calculation, it is a great option when a large number of stitches are required.  It is similar to the Provisional Cast On except it is worked in the project yarn where the final stitch on the crochet hook is placed on the left hand needle.  I have long used this technique and it was one of my earliest videos.  While my technology has vastly improved, the cast on is still an old favorite.  Watch my Crochet Cast On video to add this to your repertoire.

The bottom and side borders are worked in seed stitch.  This makes for a flat-lying edge that will be easy to seam in the finishing process.  Follow the seed stitch directions as written.  Do NOT slip the first stitch of every row.  This is a nice practice in some instances, but is not suited to edges that will be seamed.

Following the seed stitch is a lovely 14 stitch diamond pattern – hence the name, 14 Carat!  I provide both written and charted instructions for the pattern to suit your preference.  The first three and last five stitches of every row will remain in seed stitch as the diamond pattern is worked.  I abbreviated this in the written instructions as [seed 3] and [seed 5] for easy reading.

The diamonds include the usual yarn over, k2tog and ssk stitches that are standards in lace knitting.  Row 13 contains the SK2P, a left leaning double decrease.  This stitch is executed as slip one as if to knit, knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over the resulting k2tog stitch and off the right hand needle.  Slipping the first stitch as if to knit gives the decrease a smooth and decidedly left lean.  See my SK2P video for a quick tutorial.  All wrong side rows are worked in purl, excluding the seed stitch edges.  I call these recovery rows!

I believe that the key to success in lace knitting rests with two practices – lifelines and markers.  The lifelines will safeguard your work and makes unravelling and rescuing stitches a snap.  I recommend placing a lifeline after working a wrong side row as often as desired.  See Lifelines video

I routinely use markers between stitch pattern repeats to minimize errors.  The markers turn a larger piece of knitting into smaller, more manageable sections of stitches.  With each repeat isolated, errors are spotted in the repeat instead of at the end of a very long row.

I recommend placing markers between each 14 stitch repeat of the diamond pattern, but there is one problem!  In Row 13, the SK2P requires moving the marker to execute the k2tog portion of the decrease.  I solved this dilemma by using removable stitch markers.  As I got to the k2tog in the SK2P, I removed the marker, completed the SK2P, worked the last yarn over of the repeat and then replaced the marker.  The marker is now automatically in the correct place for the remainder of the design – no need to reset or rearrange it later.  You can actually see this shift in Chart A.  If you are knitting from the chart, remember that the stitch repeat is found between the bold lines with the stitches outside of these lines serving as the edge stitches (stitches before and after the * in the written directions).

In lace knitting, the most common problem is forgetting a yarn over in a row.  This omission does not mean that the row has to be removed to replace the missing yarn over.  There is a quick solution called the Afterthought Yarn Over.  I have a video waiting for you should you need it!

Below is a photo of Part 1.  I hope you will share your photos in my Ravelry group for all to admire.  I can’t wait to see them!

Happy knitting,

Michelle

14carat#1

Part One

KPHtemplate_size

Small/ Med. (Large/ XL)
22 (24 1/2)” wide, 60 (67)” long before folding

KPHtemplate_materials

  • CoBaSi by HiKoo, 50g/220 yards each, 55% cotton, 16% bamboo, 8% silk, 21% elastic nylon, 6 (8) skeins
  • US #7 (4.5mm) needle or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Size F crochet hook for cast on
  • Markers

KPHtemplate_gauge

23 sts and 31 rows = 4” in stockinette, unblocked

KPHtemplate_abbreviations

k2tog – knit two together. See K2tog video

[Seed 3] – k1, p1, k1.

[Seed 5] – k1, p1, k1, p1, k1.

SK2P (sl 1, k2tog, psso) – slip next stitch as if to knit, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over decreased stitch and off the needle. Left leaning, double decrease. See SK2P video

ssk – slip next stitch as if to knit, slip next stitch as if to knit, insert left needle into the front of these two slipped stitches from left to right and knit together.  See SSK video

yo – yarn over. See Yarn Over video

KPHtemplate_instructions

Click here to download printable version

Using Crochet Cast On method, cast on 125 (139) sts. See Crochet Cast On video

Bottom Border

Row 1. (RS) *K1, p1; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Row 2. (WS) *K1, p1; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.

Row 3. Same as 1.

Row 4. Same as 2.

Row 5. Same as 1.

Row 6. Same as 2.

Row 7. K1, p1, k1, knit to last 5 sts, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1.

Row 8. K1, p1, k1, p1, k1, purl to last 3 sts, k1, p1, k1.

Row 9. Same as 7.

Row 10. Same as 8.

 

Diamond Row

Work next 30 rows using Chart A (p. 5) or written instructions below.

Row 1. [Seed 3] k1, *k7, yo, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 2 and ALL wrong side rows through Row 30. [Seed 5] purl to last 3 sts, [seed 3].

Row 3. [Seed 3], k1, *k5, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k4; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 5. [Seed 3], k1, *k4, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, k3; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 7. [Seed 3], k1, *k3, k2tog, yo, k5, yo, ssk, k2; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 9. [Seed 3], k1, *k2, k2tog, yo, k7, yo, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 11. [Seed 3], k1, *k1, k2tog, yo, k9, yo, ssk; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 13. [Seed 3], k1, k2tog, yo, *k11, yo, SK2P, yo; repeat from * working last repeat k11, yo, ssk, k3, [seed 5].

Row 15. [Seed 3], k1, *yo, ssk, k12; repeat from * to last 9 sts, yo, ssk, k2, [seed 5].

Row 17. [Seed 3], k1, *k1, yo, ssk, k9, k2tog, yo; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 19. [Seed 3], k1, *k2, yo, ssk, k7, k2tog, yo, k1; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 21. [Seed 3], k1, *k3, yo, ssk, k5, k2tog, yo, k2; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 23. [Seed 3], k1, *k4, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, k3; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 25. [Seed 3], k1, *k5, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k4; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 27. [Seed 3], k1, *k6, yo, SK2P, yo, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Row 29. [Seed 3] k1, *k7, yo, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last 9 sts, k4, [seed 5].

Chart A

14carat chartA

Also posted in 14 Carat | 82 Responses

14 Carat Poncho KAL – starts April 7th

14caratsketch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join me April 7th as we knit a gorgeous poncho – absolutely this year’s hottest fashion accessory!  The fabric has an interesting design with superior drape.  Best of all, the simple construction makes it a garment that is flattering on EVERYONE!  Knitters of all shapes and sizes modeled the poncho and were thrilled with the flattering silhouette.  Most ponchos are available in the dreaded “one size fits all”, but I have two sizes to please everyone.  Whether you are new to garments or an experienced veteran, 14 Carat will bring you new skills as well as a stylish garment.  No previous garment experience is necessary – it’s the perfect first step to wearable knitting!

14 Carat is knit with Cobasi fingering yarn making it a lightweight top appropriate for chilly spring evenings or overly air conditioned restaurants in the summer.  Cobasi is available in solid, tonal and multi-colors that will all showcase the design.

KPHtemplate_size

Small/ Med. (Large/ XL)
22 (24 1/2)” wide, 60 (67)” long before folding

KPHtemplate_materials

  • CoBaSi by HiKoo, 50g/220 yards each, 55% cotton, 16% bamboo, 8% silk, 21% elastic nylon, 6 (8) skeins
  • US #7 (4.5mm) needle or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Size F crochet hook for cast on (surprise, it’s not a provisional cast on!)
  • Markers

KPHtemplate_gauge

23 sts and 31 rows = 4” in stockinette, unblocked

Posted in Uncategorized | 93 Responses